clue/buzz-react

Simple, async PSR-7 HTTP client for concurrently processing any number of HTTP requests, built on top of ReactPHP

v2.9.0 2020-07-03 10:43 UTC

README

Simple, async PSR-7 HTTP client for concurrently processing any number of HTTP requests, built on top of ReactPHP.

This library is heavily inspired by the great kriswallsmith/Buzz project. However, instead of blocking on each request, it relies on ReactPHP's EventLoop to process multiple requests in parallel. This allows you to interact with multiple HTTP servers (fetch URLs, talk to RESTful APIs, follow redirects etc.) at the same time. Unlike the underlying react/http-client, this project aims at providing a higher-level API that is easy to use in order to process multiple HTTP requests concurrently without having to mess with most of the low-level details.

  • Async execution of HTTP requests - Send any number of HTTP requests to any number of HTTP servers in parallel and process their responses as soon as results come in. The Promise-based design provides a sane interface to working with out of bound responses.
  • Standard interfaces - Allows easy integration with existing higher-level components by implementing PSR-7 (http-message) interfaces, ReactPHP's standard promises and streaming interfaces.
  • Lightweight, SOLID design - Provides a thin abstraction that is just good enough and does not get in your way. Builds on top of well-tested components and well-established concepts instead of reinventing the wheel.
  • Good test coverage - Comes with an automated tests suite and is regularly tested in the real world.

Table of contents

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Quickstart example

Once installed, you can use the following code to access a HTTP webserver and send some simple HTTP GET requests:

$loop = React\EventLoop\Factory::create();
$client = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop);

$client->get('http://www.google.com/')->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump($response->getHeaders(), (string)$response->getBody());
});

$loop->run();

See also the examples.

Usage

Request methods

Most importantly, this project provides a Browser object that offers several methods that resemble the HTTP protocol methods:

$browser->get($url, array $headers = array());
$browser->head($url, array $headers = array());
$browser->post($url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $contents = '');
$browser->delete($url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $contents = '');
$browser->put($url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $contents = '');
$browser->patch($url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $contents = '');

Each of these methods requires a $url and some optional parameters to send an HTTP request. Each of these method names matches the respective HTTP request method, for example the get() method sends an HTTP GET request.

You can optionally pass an associative array of additional $headers that will be sent with this HTTP request. Additionally, each method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if an outgoing request body is given and its size is known and non-empty. For an empty request body, if will only include a Content-Length: 0 request header if the request method usually expects a request body (only applies to POST, PUT and PATCH HTTP request methods).

If you're using a streaming request body, it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked unless you explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header. See also streaming request for more details.

By default, all of the above methods default to sending requests using the HTTP/1.1 protocol version. If you want to explicitly use the legacy HTTP/1.0 protocol version, you can use the withProtocolVersion() method. If you want to use any other or even custom HTTP request method, you can use the request() method.

Each of the above methods supports async operation and either fulfills with a ResponseInterface or rejects with an Exception. Please see the following chapter about promises for more details.

Promises

Sending requests is async (non-blocking), so you can actually send multiple requests in parallel. The Browser will respond to each request with a ResponseInterface message, the order is not guaranteed. Sending requests uses a Promise-based interface that makes it easy to react to when an HTTP request is completed (i.e. either successfully fulfilled or rejected with an error):

$browser->get($url)->then(
    function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
        var_dump('Response received', $response);
    },
    function (Exception $error) {
        var_dump('There was an error', $error->getMessage());
    }
);

If this looks strange to you, you can also use the more traditional blocking API.

Keep in mind that resolving the Promise with the full response message means the whole response body has to be kept in memory. This is easy to get started and works reasonably well for smaller responses (such as common HTML pages or RESTful or JSON API requests).

You may also want to look into the streaming API:

  • If you're dealing with lots of concurrent requests (100+) or
  • If you want to process individual data chunks as they happen (without having to wait for the full response body) or
  • If you're expecting a big response body size (1 MiB or more, for example when downloading binary files) or
  • If you're unsure about the response body size (better be safe than sorry when accessing arbitrary remote HTTP endpoints and the response body size is unknown in advance).

Cancellation

The returned Promise is implemented in such a way that it can be cancelled when it is still pending. Cancelling a pending promise will reject its value with an Exception and clean up any underlying resources.

$promise = $browser->get($url);

$loop->addTimer(2.0, function () use ($promise) {
    $promise->cancel();
});

Timeouts

This library uses a very efficient HTTP implementation, so most HTTP requests should usually be completed in mere milliseconds. However, when sending HTTP requests over an unreliable network (the internet), there are a number of things that can go wrong and may cause the request to fail after a time. As such, this library respects PHP's default_socket_timeout setting (default 60s) as a timeout for sending the outgoing HTTP request and waiting for a successful response and will otherwise cancel the pending request and reject its value with an Exception.

Note that this timeout value covers creating the underlying transport connection, sending the HTTP request, receiving the HTTP response headers and its full response body and following any eventual redirects. See also redirects below to configure the number of redirects to follow (or disable following redirects altogether) and also streaming below to not take receiving large response bodies into account for this timeout.

You can use the withTimeout() method to pass a custom timeout value in seconds like this:

$browser = $browser->withTimeout(10.0);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // response received within 10 seconds maximum
    var_dump($response->getHeaders());
});

Similarly, you can use a bool false to not apply a timeout at all or use a bool true value to restore the default handling. See withTimeout() for more details.

If you're using a streaming response body, the time it takes to receive the response body stream will not be included in the timeout. This allows you to keep this incoming stream open for a longer time, such as when downloading a very large stream or when streaming data over a long-lived connection.

If you're using a streaming request body, the time it takes to send the request body stream will not be included in the timeout. This allows you to keep this outgoing stream open for a longer time, such as when uploading a very large stream.

Note that this timeout handling applies to the higher-level HTTP layer. Lower layers such as socket and DNS may also apply (different) timeout values. In particular, the underlying socket connection uses the same default_socket_timeout setting to establish the underlying transport connection. To control this connection timeout behavior, you can inject a custom Connector like this:

$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser(
    $loop,
    new React\Socket\Connector(
        $loop,
        array(
            'timeout' => 5
        )
    )
);

Authentication

This library supports HTTP Basic Authentication using the Authorization: Basic … request header or allows you to set an explicit Authorization request header.

By default, this library does not include an outgoing Authorization request header. If the server requires authentication, if may return a 401 (Unauthorized) status code which will reject the request by default (see also the withRejectErrorResponse() method below).

In order to pass authentication details, you can simple pass the username and password as part of the request URL like this:

$promise = $browser->get('https://user:pass@example.com/api');

Note that special characters in the authentication details have to be percent-encoded, see also rawurlencode(). This example will automatically pass the base64-encoded authentication details using the outgoing Authorization: Basic … request header. If the HTTP endpoint you're talking to requires any other authentication scheme, you can also pass this header explicitly. This is common when using (RESTful) HTTP APIs that use OAuth access tokens or JSON Web Tokens (JWT):

$token = 'abc123';

$promise = $browser->get(
    'https://example.com/api',
    array(
        'Authorization' => 'Bearer ' . $token
    )
);

When following redirects, the Authorization request header will never be sent to any remote hosts by default. When following a redirect where the Location response header contains authentication details, these details will be sent for following requests. See also redirects below.

Redirects

By default, this library follows any redirects and obeys 3xx (Redirection) status codes using the Location response header from the remote server. The promise will be fulfilled with the last response from the chain of redirects.

$browser->get($url, $headers)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // the final response will end up here
    var_dump($response->getHeaders());
});

Any redirected requests will follow the semantics of the original request and will include the same request headers as the original request except for those listed below. If the original request contained a request body, this request body will never be passed to the redirected request. Accordingly, each redirected request will remove any Content-Length and Content-Type request headers.

If the original request used HTTP authentication with an Authorization request header, this request header will only be passed as part of the redirected request if the redirected URL is using the same host. In other words, the Authorizaton request header will not be forwarded to other foreign hosts due to possible privacy/security concerns. When following a redirect where the Location response header contains authentication details, these details will be sent for following requests.

You can use the withFollowRedirects() method to control the maximum number of redirects to follow or to return any redirect responses as-is and apply custom redirection logic like this:

$browser = $browser->withFollowRedirects(false);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // any redirects will now end up here
    var_dump($response->getHeaders());
});

See also withFollowRedirects() for more details.

Blocking

As stated above, this library provides you a powerful, async API by default.

If, however, you want to integrate this into your traditional, blocking environment, you should look into also using clue/reactphp-block.

The resulting blocking code could look something like this:

use Clue\React\Block;

$loop = React\EventLoop\Factory::create();
$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop);

$promise = $browser->get('http://example.com/');

try {
    $response = Block\await($promise, $loop);
    // response successfully received
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // an error occured while performing the request
}

Similarly, you can also process multiple requests concurrently and await an array of Response objects:

$promises = array(
    $browser->get('http://example.com/'),
    $browser->get('http://www.example.org/'),
);

$responses = Block\awaitAll($promises, $loop);

Please refer to clue/reactphp-block for more details.

Keep in mind the above remark about buffering the whole response message in memory. As an alternative, you may also see one of the following chapters for the streaming API.

Concurrency

As stated above, this library provides you a powerful, async API. Being able to send a large number of requests at once is one of the core features of this project. For instance, you can easily send 100 requests concurrently while processing SQL queries at the same time.

Remember, with great power comes great responsibility. Sending an excessive number of requests may either take up all resources on your side or it may even get you banned by the remote side if it sees an unreasonable number of requests from your side.

// watch out if array contains many elements
foreach ($urls as $url) {
    $browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
        var_dump($response->getHeaders());
    });
}

As a consequence, it's usually recommended to limit concurrency on the sending side to a reasonable value. It's common to use a rather small limit, as doing more than a dozen of things at once may easily overwhelm the receiving side. You can use clue/reactphp-mq as a lightweight in-memory queue to concurrently do many (but not too many) things at once:

// wraps Browser in a Queue object that executes no more than 10 operations at once
$q = new Clue\React\Mq\Queue(10, null, function ($url) use ($browser) {
    return $browser->get($url);
});

foreach ($urls as $url) {
    $q($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
        var_dump($response->getHeaders());
    });
}

Additional requests that exceed the concurrency limit will automatically be enqueued until one of the pending requests completes. This integrates nicely with the existing Promise-based API. Please refer to clue/reactphp-mq for more details.

This in-memory approach works reasonably well for some thousand outstanding requests. If you're processing a very large input list (think millions of rows in a CSV or NDJSON file), you may want to look into using a streaming approach instead. See clue/reactphp-flux for more details.

Streaming response

All of the above examples assume you want to store the whole response body in memory. This is easy to get started and works reasonably well for smaller responses.

However, there are several situations where it's usually a better idea to use a streaming approach, where only small chunks have to be kept in memory:

  • If you're dealing with lots of concurrent requests (100+) or
  • If you want to process individual data chunks as they happen (without having to wait for the full response body) or
  • If you're expecting a big response body size (1 MiB or more, for example when downloading binary files) or
  • If you're unsure about the response body size (better be safe than sorry when accessing arbitrary remote HTTP endpoints and the response body size is unknown in advance).

You can use the requestStreaming() method to send an arbitrary HTTP request and receive a streaming response. It uses the same HTTP message API, but does not buffer the response body in memory. It only processes the response body in small chunks as data is received and forwards this data through ReactPHP's Stream API. This works for (any number of) responses of arbitrary sizes.

This means it resolves with a normal ResponseInterface, which can be used to access the response message parameters as usual. You can access the message body as usual, however it now also implements ReactPHP's ReadableStreamInterface as well as parts of the PSR-7's StreamInterface.

$browser->requestStreaming('GET', $url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    $body = $response->getBody();
    assert($body instanceof Psr\Http\Message\StreamInterface);
    assert($body instanceof React\Stream\ReadableStreamInterface);

    $body->on('data', function ($chunk) {
        echo $chunk;
    });

    $body->on('error', function (Exception $error) {
        echo 'Error: ' . $error->getMessage() . PHP_EOL;
    });

    $body->on('close', function () {
        echo '[DONE]' . PHP_EOL;
    });
});

See also the stream download example and the stream forwarding example.

You can invoke the following methods on the message body:

$body->on($event, $callback);
$body->eof();
$body->isReadable();
$body->pipe(React\Stream\WritableStreamInterface $dest, array $options = array());
$body->close();
$body->pause();
$body->resume();

Because the message body is in a streaming state, invoking the following methods doesn't make much sense:

$body->__toString(); // ''
$body->detach(); // throws BadMethodCallException
$body->getSize(); // null
$body->tell(); // throws BadMethodCallException
$body->isSeekable(); // false
$body->seek(); // throws BadMethodCallException
$body->rewind(); // throws BadMethodCallException
$body->isWritable(); // false
$body->write(); // throws BadMethodCallException
$body->read(); // throws BadMethodCallException
$body->getContents(); // throws BadMethodCallException

Note how timeouts apply slightly differently when using streaming. In streaming mode, the timeout value covers creating the underlying transport connection, sending the HTTP request, receiving the HTTP response headers and following any eventual redirects. In particular, the timeout value does not take receiving (possibly large) response bodies into account.

If you want to integrate the streaming response into a higher level API, then working with Promise objects that resolve with Stream objects is often inconvenient. Consider looking into also using react/promise-stream. The resulting streaming code could look something like this:

use React\Promise\Stream;

function download(Browser $browser, string $url): React\Stream\ReadableStreamInterface {
    return Stream\unwrapReadable(
        $browser->requestStreaming('GET', $url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
            return $response->getBody();
        })
    );
}

$stream = download($browser, $url);
$stream->on('data', function ($data) {
    echo $data;
});

See also the requestStreaming() method for more details.

Legacy info: Legacy versions prior to v2.9.0 used the legacy streaming option. This option is now deprecated but otherwise continues to show the exact same behavior.

Streaming request

Besides streaming the response body, you can also stream the request body. This can be useful if you want to send big POST requests (uploading files etc.) or process many outgoing streams at once. Instead of passing the body as a string, you can simply pass an instance implementing ReactPHP's ReadableStreamInterface to the request methods like this:

$browser->post($url, array(), $stream)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    echo 'Successfully sent.';
});

If you're using a streaming request body (React\Stream\ReadableStreamInterface), it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked or you have to explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header like so:

$body = new React\Stream\ThroughStream();
$loop->addTimer(1.0, function () use ($body) {
    $body->end("hello world");
});

$browser->post($url, array('Content-Length' => '11'), $body);

If the streaming request body emits an error event or is explicitly closed without emitting a successful end event first, the request will automatically be closed and rejected.

HTTP proxy

You can also establish your outgoing connections through an HTTP CONNECT proxy server by adding a dependency to clue/reactphp-http-proxy.

HTTP CONNECT proxy servers (also commonly known as "HTTPS proxy" or "SSL proxy") are commonly used to tunnel HTTPS traffic through an intermediary ("proxy"), to conceal the origin address (anonymity) or to circumvent address blocking (geoblocking). While many (public) HTTP CONNECT proxy servers often limit this to HTTPS port443 only, this can technically be used to tunnel any TCP/IP-based protocol, such as plain HTTP and TLS-encrypted HTTPS.

$proxy = new Clue\React\HttpProxy\ProxyConnector(
    'http://127.0.0.1:8080',
    new React\Socket\Connector($loop)
);

$connector = new React\Socket\Connector($loop, array(
    'tcp' => $proxy,
    'dns' => false
));

$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop, $connector);

See also the HTTP CONNECT proxy example.

SOCKS proxy

You can also establish your outgoing connections through a SOCKS proxy server by adding a dependency to clue/reactphp-socks.

The SOCKS proxy protocol family (SOCKS5, SOCKS4 and SOCKS4a) is commonly used to tunnel HTTP(S) traffic through an intermediary ("proxy"), to conceal the origin address (anonymity) or to circumvent address blocking (geoblocking). While many (public) SOCKS proxy servers often limit this to HTTP(S) port 80 and 443 only, this can technically be used to tunnel any TCP/IP-based protocol.

$proxy = new Clue\React\Socks\Client(
    'socks://127.0.0.1:1080',
    new React\Socket\Connector($loop)
);

$connector = new React\Socket\Connector($loop, array(
    'tcp' => $proxy,
    'dns' => false
));

$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop, $connector);

See also the SOCKS proxy example.

SSH proxy

You can also establish your outgoing connections through an SSH server by adding a dependency to clue/reactphp-ssh-proxy.

Secure Shell (SSH) is a secure network protocol that is most commonly used to access a login shell on a remote server. Its architecture allows it to use multiple secure channels over a single connection. Among others, this can also be used to create an "SSH tunnel", which is commonly used to tunnel HTTP(S) traffic through an intermediary ("proxy"), to conceal the origin address (anonymity) or to circumvent address blocking (geoblocking). This can be used to tunnel any TCP/IP-based protocol (HTTP, SMTP, IMAP etc.), allows you to access local services that are otherwise not accessible from the outside (database behind firewall) and as such can also be used for plain HTTP and TLS-encrypted HTTPS.

$proxy = new Clue\React\SshProxy\SshSocksConnector('me@localhost:22', $loop);

$connector = new React\Socket\Connector($loop, array(
    'tcp' => $proxy,
    'dns' => false
));

$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop, $connector);

See also the SSH proxy example.

Unix domain sockets

By default, this library supports transport over plaintext TCP/IP and secure TLS connections for the http:// and https:// URL schemes respectively. This library also supports Unix domain sockets (UDS) when explicitly configured.

In order to use a UDS path, you have to explicitly configure the connector to override the destination URL so that the hostname given in the request URL will no longer be used to establish the connection:

$connector = new React\Socket\FixedUriConnector(
    'unix:///var/run/docker.sock',
    new React\Socket\UnixConnector($loop)
);

$browser = new Browser($loop, $connector);

$client->get('http://localhost/info')->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump($response->getHeaders(), (string)$response->getBody());
});

See also the Unix Domain Sockets (UDS) example.

API

Browser

The Clue\React\Buzz\Browser is responsible for sending HTTP requests to your HTTP server and keeps track of pending incoming HTTP responses. It also registers everything with the main EventLoop.

$loop = React\EventLoop\Factory::create();

$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop);

If you need custom connector settings (DNS resolution, TLS parameters, timeouts, proxy servers etc.), you can explicitly pass a custom instance of the ConnectorInterface:

$connector = new React\Socket\Connector($loop, array(
    'dns' => '127.0.0.1',
    'tcp' => array(
        'bindto' => '192.168.10.1:0'
    ),
    'tls' => array(
        'verify_peer' => false,
        'verify_peer_name' => false
    )
));

$browser = new Clue\React\Buzz\Browser($loop, $connector);

get()

The get(string|UriInterface $url, array $headers = array()): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an HTTP GET request.

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump((string)$response->getBody());
});

See also example 01.

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

post()

The post(string|UriInterface $url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $contents = ''): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an HTTP POST request.

$browser->post(
    $url,
    [
        'Content-Type' => 'application/json'
    ],
    json_encode($data)
)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump(json_decode((string)$response->getBody()));
});

See also example 04.

This method is also commonly used to submit HTML form data:

$data = [
    'user' => 'Alice',
    'password' => 'secret'
];

$browser->post(
    $url,
    [
        'Content-Type' => 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded'
    ],
    http_build_query($data)
);

This method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if the outgoing request body is a string. If you're using a streaming request body (ReadableStreamInterface), it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked or you have to explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header like so:

$body = new React\Stream\ThroughStream();
$loop->addTimer(1.0, function () use ($body) {
    $body->end("hello world");
});

$browser->post($url, array('Content-Length' => '11'), $body);

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

head()

The head(string|UriInterface $url, array $headers = array()): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an HTTP HEAD request.

$browser->head($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump($response->getHeaders());
});

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

patch()

The patch(string|UriInterface $url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $contents = ''): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an HTTP PATCH request.

$browser->patch(
    $url,
    [
        'Content-Type' => 'application/json'
    ],
    json_encode($data)
)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump(json_decode((string)$response->getBody()));
});

This method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if the outgoing request body is a string. If you're using a streaming request body (ReadableStreamInterface), it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked or you have to explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header like so:

$body = new React\Stream\ThroughStream();
$loop->addTimer(1.0, function () use ($body) {
    $body->end("hello world");
});

$browser->patch($url, array('Content-Length' => '11'), $body);

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

put()

The put(string|UriInterface $url, array $headers = array()): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an HTTP PUT request.

$browser->put(
    $url,
    [
        'Content-Type' => 'text/xml'
    ],
    $xml->asXML()
)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump((string)$response->getBody());
});

See also example 05.

This method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if the outgoing request body is a string. If you're using a streaming request body (ReadableStreamInterface), it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked or you have to explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header like so:

$body = new React\Stream\ThroughStream();
$loop->addTimer(1.0, function () use ($body) {
    $body->end("hello world");
});

$browser->put($url, array('Content-Length' => '11'), $body);

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

delete()

The delete(string|UriInterface $url, array $headers = array()): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an HTTP DELETE request.

$browser->delete($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump((string)$response->getBody());
});

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

request()

The request(string $method, string $url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $body = ''): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an arbitrary HTTP request.

The preferred way to send an HTTP request is by using the above request methods, for example the get() method to send an HTTP GET request.

As an alternative, if you want to use a custom HTTP request method, you can use this method:

$browser->request('OPTIONS', $url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    var_dump((string)$response->getBody());
});

This method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if the size of the outgoing request body is known and non-empty. For an empty request body, if will only include a Content-Length: 0 request header if the request method usually expects a request body (only applies to POST, PUT and PATCH).

If you're using a streaming request body (ReadableStreamInterface), it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked or you have to explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header like so:

$body = new React\Stream\ThroughStream();
$loop->addTimer(1.0, function () use ($body) {
    $body->end("hello world");
});

$browser->request('POST', $url, array('Content-Length' => '11'), $body);

Note that this method is available as of v2.9.0 and always buffers the response body before resolving. It does not respect the deprecated streaming option. If you want to stream the response body, you can use the requestStreaming() method instead.

requestStreaming()

The requestStreaming(string $method, string $url, array $headers = array(), string|ReadableStreamInterface $body = ''): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an arbitrary HTTP request and receive a streaming response without buffering the response body.

The preferred way to send an HTTP request is by using the above request methods, for example the get() method to send an HTTP GET request. Each of these methods will buffer the whole response body in memory by default. This is easy to get started and works reasonably well for smaller responses.

In some situations, it's a better idea to use a streaming approach, where only small chunks have to be kept in memory. You can use this method to send an arbitrary HTTP request and receive a streaming response. It uses the same HTTP message API, but does not buffer the response body in memory. It only processes the response body in small chunks as data is received and forwards this data through ReactPHP's Stream API. This works for (any number of) responses of arbitrary sizes.

$browser->requestStreaming('GET', $url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    $body = $response->getBody();
    assert($body instanceof Psr\Http\Message\StreamInterface);
    assert($body instanceof React\Stream\ReadableStreamInterface);

    $body->on('data', function ($chunk) {
        echo $chunk;
    });

    $body->on('error', function (Exception $error) {
        echo 'Error: ' . $error->getMessage() . PHP_EOL;
    });

    $body->on('close', function () {
        echo '[DONE]' . PHP_EOL;
    });
});

See also ReadableStreamInterface and the streaming response for more details, examples and possible use-cases.

This method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if the size of the outgoing request body is known and non-empty. For an empty request body, if will only include a Content-Length: 0 request header if the request method usually expects a request body (only applies to POST, PUT and PATCH).

If you're using a streaming request body (ReadableStreamInterface), it will default to using Transfer-Encoding: chunked or you have to explicitly pass in a matching Content-Length request header like so:

$body = new React\Stream\ThroughStream();
$loop->addTimer(1.0, function () use ($body) {
    $body->end("hello world");
});

$browser->requestStreaming('POST', $url, array('Content-Length' => '11'), $body);

Note that this method is available as of v2.9.0 and always resolves the response without buffering the response body. It does not respect the deprecated streaming option. If you want to buffer the response body, use can use the request() method instead.

submit()

Deprecated since v2.9.0, see post() instead.

The deprecated submit(string|UriInterface $url, array $fields, array $headers = array(), string $method = 'POST'): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to submit an array of field values similar to submitting a form (application/x-www-form-urlencoded).

// deprecated: see post() instead
$browser->submit($url, array('user' => 'test', 'password' => 'secret'));

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $url as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

send()

Deprecated since v2.9.0, see request() instead.

The deprecated send(RequestInterface $request): PromiseInterface<ResponseInterface> method can be used to send an arbitrary instance implementing the RequestInterface (PSR-7).

The preferred way to send an HTTP request is by using the above request methods, for example the get() method to send an HTTP GET request.

As an alternative, if you want to use a custom HTTP request method, you can use this method:

$request = new Request('OPTIONS', $url);

// deprecated: see request() instead
$browser->send($request)->then(…);

This method will automatically add a matching Content-Length request header if the size of the outgoing request body is known and non-empty. For an empty request body, if will only include a Content-Length: 0 request header if the request method usually expects a request body (only applies to POST, PUT and PATCH).

withTimeout()

The withTimeout(bool|number $timeout): Browser method can be used to change the maximum timeout used for waiting for pending requests.

You can pass in the number of seconds to use as a new timeout value:

$browser = $browser->withTimeout(10.0);

You can pass in a bool false to disable any timeouts. In this case, requests can stay pending forever:

$browser = $browser->withTimeout(false);

You can pass in a bool true to re-enable default timeout handling. This will respects PHP's default_socket_timeout setting (default 60s):

$browser = $browser->withTimeout(true);

See also timeouts for more details about timeout handling.

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. this method actually returns a new Browser instance with the given timeout value applied.

withFollowRedirects()

The withTimeout(bool|int $$followRedirects): Browser method can be used to change how HTTP redirects will be followed.

You can pass in the maximum number of redirects to follow:

$new = $browser->withFollowRedirects(5);

The request will automatically be rejected when the number of redirects is exceeded. You can pass in a 0 to reject the request for any redirects encountered:

$browser = $browser->withFollowRedirects(0);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // only non-redirected responses will now end up here
    var_dump($response->getHeaders());
});

You can pass in a bool false to disable following any redirects. In this case, requests will resolve with the redirection response instead of following the Location response header:

$browser = $browser->withFollowRedirects(false);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // any redirects will now end up here
    var_dump($response->getHeaderLine('Location'));
});

You can pass in a bool true to re-enable default redirect handling. This defaults to following a maximum of 10 redirects:

$browser = $browser->withFollowRedirects(true);

See also redirects for more details about redirect handling.

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. this method actually returns a new Browser instance with the given redirect setting applied.

withRejectErrorResponse()

The withRejectErrorResponse(bool $obeySuccessCode): Browser method can be used to change whether non-successful HTTP response status codes (4xx and 5xx) will be rejected.

You can pass in a bool false to disable rejecting incoming responses that use a 4xx or 5xx response status code. In this case, requests will resolve with the response message indicating an error condition:

$browser = $browser->withRejectErrorResponse(false);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // any HTTP response will now end up here
    var_dump($response->getStatusCode(), $response->getReasonPhrase());
});

You can pass in a bool true to re-enable default status code handling. This defaults to rejecting any response status codes in the 4xx or 5xx range with a ResponseException:

$browser = $browser->withRejectErrorResponse(true);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // any successful HTTP response will now end up here
    var_dump($response->getStatusCode(), $response->getReasonPhrase());
}, function (Exception $e) {
    if ($e instanceof Clue\React\Buzz\Message\ResponseException) {
        // any HTTP response error message will now end up here
        $response = $e->getResponse();
        var_dump($response->getStatusCode(), $response->getReasonPhrase());
    } else {
        var_dump($e->getMessage());
    }
});

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. this method actually returns a new Browser instance with the given setting applied.

withBase()

The withBase(string|null|UriInterface $baseUrl): Browser method can be used to change the base URL used to resolve relative URLs to.

If you configure a base URL, any requests to relative URLs will be processed by first prepending this absolute base URL. Note that this merely prepends the base URL and does not resolve any relative path references (like ../ etc.). This is mostly useful for (RESTful) API calls where all endpoints (URLs) are located under a common base URL.

$browser = $browser->withBase('http://api.example.com/v3');

// will request http://api.example.com/v3/example
$browser->get('/example')->then(…);

You can pass in a null base URL to return a new instance that does not use a base URL:

$browser = $browser->withBase(null);

Accordingly, any requests using relative URLs to a browser that does not use a base URL can not be completed and will be rejected without sending a request.

This method will throw an InvalidArgumentException if the given $baseUrl argument is not a valid URL.

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. the withBase() method actually returns a new Browser instance with the given base URL applied.

For BC reasons, this method accepts the $baseUrl as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

Changelog: As of v2.9.0 this method accepts a null value to reset the base URL. Earlier versions had to use the deprecated withoutBase() method to reset the base URL.

withProtocolVersion()

The withProtocolVersion(string $protocolVersion): Browser method can be used to change the HTTP protocol version that will be used for all subsequent requests.

All the above request methods default to sending requests as HTTP/1.1. This is the preferred HTTP protocol version which also provides decent backwards-compatibility with legacy HTTP/1.0 servers. As such, there should rarely be a need to explicitly change this protocol version.

If you want to explicitly use the legacy HTTP/1.0 protocol version, you can use this method:

$newBrowser = $browser->withProtocolVersion('1.0');

$newBrowser->get($url)->then(…);

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. this method actually returns a new Browser instance with the new protocol version applied.

withResponseBuffer()

The withRespomseBuffer(int $maximumSize): Browser method can be used to change the maximum size for buffering a response body.

The preferred way to send an HTTP request is by using the above request methods, for example the get() method to send an HTTP GET request. Each of these methods will buffer the whole response body in memory by default. This is easy to get started and works reasonably well for smaller responses.

By default, the response body buffer will be limited to 16 MiB. If the response body exceeds this maximum size, the request will be rejected.

You can pass in the maximum number of bytes to buffer:

$browser = $browser->withResponseBuffer(1024 * 1024);

$browser->get($url)->then(function (Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface $response) {
    // response body will not exceed 1 MiB
    var_dump($response->getHeaders(), (string) $response->getBody());
});

Note that the response body buffer has to be kept in memory for each pending request until its transfer is completed and it will only be freed after a pending request is fulfilled. As such, increasing this maximum buffer size to allow larger response bodies is usually not recommended. Instead, you can use the requestStreaming() method to receive responses with arbitrary sizes without buffering. Accordingly, this maximum buffer size setting has no effect on streaming responses.

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. this method actually returns a new Browser instance with the given setting applied.

withOptions()

Deprecated since v2.9.0, see withTimeout(), withFollowRedirects() and withRejectErrorResponse() instead.

The deprecated withOptions(array $options): Browser method can be used to change the options to use:

The Browser class exposes several options for the handling of HTTP transactions. These options resemble some of PHP's HTTP context options and can be controlled via the following API (and their defaults):

// deprecated
$newBrowser = $browser->withOptions(array(
    'timeout' => null, // see withTimeout() instead
    'followRedirects' => true, // see withFollowRedirects() instead
    'maxRedirects' => 10, // see withFollowRedirects() instead
    'obeySuccessCode' => true, // see withRejectErrorResponse() instead
    'streaming' => false, // deprecated, see requestStreaming() instead
));

See also timeouts, redirects and streaming for more details.

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. this method actually returns a new Browser instance with the options applied.

withoutBase()

Deprecated since v2.9.0, see withBase() instead.

The deprecated withoutBase(): Browser method can be used to remove the base URL.

// deprecated: see withBase() instead
$newBrowser = $browser->withoutBase();

Notice that the Browser is an immutable object, i.e. the withoutBase() method actually returns a new Browser instance without any base URL applied.

See also withBase().

ResponseInterface

The Psr\Http\Message\ResponseInterface represents the incoming response received from the Browser.

This is a standard interface defined in PSR-7: HTTP message interfaces, see its ResponseInterface definition which in turn extends the MessageInterface definition.

RequestInterface

The Psr\Http\Message\RequestInterface represents the outgoing request to be sent via the Browser.

This is a standard interface defined in PSR-7: HTTP message interfaces, see its RequestInterface definition which in turn extends the MessageInterface definition.

UriInterface

The Psr\Http\Message\UriInterface represents an absolute or relative URI (aka URL).

This is a standard interface defined in PSR-7: HTTP message interfaces, see its UriInterface definition.

For BC reasons, the request methods accept the URL as either a string value or as an UriInterface. It's recommended to explicitly cast any objects implementing UriInterface to string.

ResponseException

The ResponseException is an Exception sub-class that will be used to reject a request promise if the remote server returns a non-success status code (anything but 2xx or 3xx). You can control this behavior via the withRejectErrorResponse() method.

The getCode(): int method can be used to return the HTTP response status code.

The getResponse(): ResponseInterface method can be used to access its underlying ResponseInterface object.

Install

The recommended way to install this library is through Composer. New to Composer?

This project follows SemVer. This will install the latest supported version:

$ composer require clue/buzz-react:^2.9

See also the CHANGELOG for details about version upgrades.

This project aims to run on any platform and thus does not require any PHP extensions and supports running on legacy PHP 5.3 through current PHP 7+ and HHVM. It's highly recommended to use PHP 7+ for this project.

Tests

To run the test suite, you first need to clone this repo and then install all dependencies through Composer:

$ composer install

To run the test suite, go to the project root and run:

$ php vendor/bin/phpunit

The test suite also contains a number of functional integration tests that send test HTTP requests against the online service http://httpbin.org and thus rely on a stable internet connection. If you do not want to run these, they can simply be skipped like this:

$ php vendor/bin/phpunit --exclude-group online

License

This project is released under the permissive MIT license.

Did you know that I offer custom development services and issuing invoices for sponsorships of releases and for contributions? Contact me (@clue) for details.