ueberdosis/tiptap-php

A PHP package to work with Tiptap output

1.3.0 2023-06-25 19:44 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2024-05-25 21:43:31 UTC


README

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A PHP package to work with Tiptap content. You can transform Tiptap-compatible JSON to HTML, and the other way around, sanitize your content, or just modify it.

Installation

You can install the package via composer:

composer require ueberdosis/tiptap-php

Usage

The PHP package mimics large parts of the JavaScript package. If you know your way around Tiptap, the PHP syntax will feel familiar to you.

Convert Tiptap HTML to JSON

Let’s start by converting a HTML snippet to a PHP array with a Tiptap-compatible structure:

(new Tiptap\Editor)
    ->setContent('<p>Example Text</p>')
    ->getDocument();

// Returns:
// ['type' => 'doc', 'content' => …]

You can get a JSON string in PHP, too.

(new Tiptap\Editor)
    ->setContent('<p>Example Text</p>')
    ->getJSON();

// Returns:
// {"type": "doc", "content": …}

Convert Tiptap JSON to HTML

The other way works aswell. Just pass a JSON string or an PHP array to generate the HTML.

(new Tiptap\Editor)
    ->setContent([
        'type' => 'doc',
        'content' => [
            [
                'type' => 'paragraph',
                'content' => [
                    [
                        'type' => 'text',
                        'text' => 'Example Text',
                    ],
                ]
            ]
        ],
    ])
    ->getHTML();

// Returns:
// <h1>Example Text</h1>

This doesn’t fully adhere to the ProseMirror schema. Some things are supported too, for example aren’t marks allowed in a CodeBlock.

If you need better schema support, create an issue with the feature you’re missing.

Syntax highlighting for code blocks with highlight.php

The default CodeBlock extension doesn’t add syntax highlighting to your code blocks. However, if you want to add syntax highlighting to your code blocks, there’s a special CodeBlockHighlight extension.

Swapping our the default one works like that:

(new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        new \Tiptap\Extensions\StarterKit([
            'codeBlock' => false,
        ]),
        new \Tiptap\Nodes\CodeBlockHighlight(),
    ],
]))
->setContent('<pre><code>&lt;?php phpinfo()</code></pre>')
->getHTML();

// Returns:
// <pre><code class="hljs php"><span class="hljs-meta">&lt;?php</span> phpinfo()</code></pre>

This is still unstyled. You need to load a CSS file to add colors to the output, for example like that:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="//unpkg.com/@highlightjs/cdn-assets@11.4.0/styles/default.min.css">

Boom, syntax highlighting! By the way, this is powered by the amazing scrivo/highlight.php.

Syntax highlighting for code blocks with Shiki (Requires Node.js)

There is an alternate syntax highlighter that utilizes Shiki. Shiki is a beautiful syntax highlighter powered by the same language engine that many code editors use. The major differences from the CodeBlockHighlight extensions are, 1) you must install the shiki npm package, 2) Shiki code highlighting works by injecting inline styles so pulling in a external css file is not required, 3) you can use most VS Code themes to highlight your code.

To use the Shiki extension, first install the npm package

npm install shiki

Then follow the example below:

(new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        new \Tiptap\Extensions\StarterKit([
            'codeBlock' => false,
        ]),
        new \Tiptap\Nodes\CodeBlockShiki,
    ],
]))
->setContent('<pre><code>&lt;?php phpinfo()</code></pre>')
->getHTML();

To configure the theme or default language for code blocks pass additonal configuration into the constructor as show below:

(new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        new \Tiptap\Extensions\StarterKit([
            'codeBlock' => false,
        ]),
        new \Tiptap\Nodes\CodeBlockShiki([
            'theme' => 'github-dark', // default: nord, see https://github.com/shikijs/shiki/blob/main/docs/themes.md
            'defaultLanguage' => 'php' // default: html, see https://github.com/shikijs/shiki/blob/main/docs/languages.md
            'guessLanguage' => true // default: true, if the language isn’t passed, it tries to guess the language with highlight.php
        ]),
    ],
]))
->setContent('<pre><code>&lt;?php phpinfo()</code></pre>')
->getHTML();

Under the hood the Shiki extension utilizes Shiki PHP by Spatie, so please see the documentation for additional details and considerations.

Convert content to plain text

Content can also be transformed to plain text, for example to put it into a search index.

(new Editor)
    ->setContent('<h1>Heading</h1><p>Paragraph</p>')
    ->getText();

// Returns:
// "Heading
//
// Paragraph"

What’s coming between blocks can be configured, too.

(new Editor)
    ->setContent('<h1>Heading</h1><p>Paragraph</p>')
    ->getText([
        'blockSeparator' => "\n",
    ]);

// Returns:
// "Heading
// Paragraph"

Sanitize content

A great use case for the PHP package is to clean (or “sanitize”) the content. You can do that with the sanitize() method. Works with JSON strings, PHP arrays and HTML.

It’ll return the same format you’re using as the input format.

(new Tiptap\Editor)
    ->sanitize('<p>Example Text<script>alert("HACKED!")</script></p>');

// Returns:
// '<p>Example Text</p>'

Modifying the content

With the descendants() method you can loop through all nodes recursively as you are used to from the JavaScript package. But in PHP, you can even modify the node to update attributes and all that.

Warning: You need to add & to the parameter. Thats keeping a reference to the original item and allows to modify the original one, instead of just a copy.

$editor->descendants(function (&$node) {
    if ($node->type !== 'heading') {
        return;
    }

    $node->attrs->level = 1;
});

Configuration

Pass the configuration to the constructor of the editor. There’s not much to configure, but at least you can pass the initial content and load specific extensions.

new Tiptap\Editor([
    'content' => '<p>Example Text</p>',
    'extensions' => [
        new Tiptap\Extensions\StarterKit,
    ],
])

The StarterKit is loaded by default. If you just want to use that, there’s no need to set it.

Extensions

By default, the StarterKit is loaded, but you can pass a custom array of extensions aswell.

new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        new Tiptap\Extensions\StarterKit,
        new Tiptap\Nodes\Link,
    ],
])

Configure extensions

Some extensions can be configured. Just pass an array to the constructor, that’s it. We’re aiming to support the same configuration as the JavaScript package.

new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        // …
        new Tiptap\Nodes\Heading([
            'levels' => [1, 2, 3],
        ]),
    ],
])

You can pass custom HTML attributes through the configuration, too.

new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        // …
        new Tiptap\Nodes\Heading([
            'HTMLAttributes' => [
                'class' => 'my-custom-class',
            ],
        ]),
    ],
])

For the StarterKit, it’s slightly different, but works as you are used to from the JavaScript package.

new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        new Tiptap\Extensions\StarterKit([
            'codeBlock' => false,
            'heading' => [
                'HTMLAttributes' => [
                    'class' => 'my-custom-class',
                ],
            ]
        ]),
    ],
])

Extend existing extensions

If you need to change minor details of the supported extensions, you can just extend an extension.

<?php

class CustomBold extends \Tiptap\Marks\Bold
{
    public function renderHTML($mark)
    {
        // Renders <b> instead of <strong>
        return ['b', 0]
    }
}

new Tiptap\Editor([
    'extensions' => [
        new Paragraph,
        new Text,
        new CustomBold,
    ],
])

Custom extensions

You can even build custom extensions. If you are used to the JavaScript API, you will be surprised how much of that works in PHP, too. 🤯 Find a simple example below.

Make sure to dig through the extensions in this repository to learn more about the PHP extension API.

<?php

use Tiptap\Core\Node;

class CustomNode extends Node
{
    public static $name = 'customNode';
    
    public static $priority = 100;

    public function addOptions()
    {
        return [
            'HTMLAttributes' => [],
        ];
    }

    public function parseHTML()
    {
        return [
            [
                'tag' => 'my-custom-tag[data-id]',
            ],
            [
                'tag' => 'my-custom-tag',
                'getAttrs' => function ($DOMNode) {
                    return ! \Tiptap\Utils\InlineStyle::hasAttribute($DOMNode, [
                        'background-color' => '#000000',
                    ]) ? null : false;
                },
            ],
            [
                'style' => 'background-color',
                'getAttrs' => function ($value) {
                    return (bool) preg_match('/^(black)$/', $value) ? null : false;
                },
            ],
        ];
    }

    public function renderHTML($node)
    {
        return ['my-custom-tag', ['class' => 'foobar'], 0]
    }
}

Extension priority

Extensions are evaluated in the order of descending priority. By default, all Nodes, Marks, and Extensions, have a priority value of 100.

Priority should be defined when creating a Node extension to match markup that could be matched be other Nodes - an example of this is the TaskItem Node which has evaluation priority over the ListItem Node.

Testing

composer test

You can install nodemon (npm install -g nodemon) to keep the test suite running and watch for file changes:

composer test-watch

Contributing

Please see CONTRIBUTING for details.

Security Vulnerabilities

Please review our security policy on how to report security vulnerabilities.

Credits

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.