laragear/webauthn

Authenticate users with Passkeys: fingerprints, patterns and biometric data.

v2.0.3 2024-03-18 22:38 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2024-05-28 23:51:05 UTC


README

Latest Version on Packagist Latest stable test run Codecov coverage CodeClimate Maintainability Sonarcloud Status Laravel Octane Compatibility

Authenticate users with Passkeys: fingerprints, patterns and biometric data.

// App\Http\Controllers\LoginController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AssertedRequest;

public function login(AssertedRequest $request)
{
    $user = $request->login();

    return response()->json(['message' => "Welcome back, $user->name!"]);
}

Tip

You want to add two-factor authentication to your app? Check out Laragear TwoFactor.

Become a sponsor

Your support allows me to keep this package free, up-to-date and maintainable. Alternatively, you can spread the word!

Requirements

  • Laravel 10.x or later.
  • PHP 8.1 or later.
  • The ext-openssl extension.
  • The ext-sodium extension (optional, for EdDSA 25519 public keys).

Tip

If you can't enable the ext-sodium extension for whatever reason, you may try installing paragonie/sodium_compat.

Installation

Require this package into your project using Composer:

composer require laragear/webauthn

How Passkeys work?

Passkeys, hence WebAuthn, consists in two ceremonies: attestation, and assertion.

Attestation is the process of asking the authenticator (a phone, laptop, USB key...) to create a private-public key pair, save the private key internally, and store the public key inside your app. For that to work, the browser must support WebAuthn, which is what intermediates between the authenticator (OS & device hardware) and the server.

Assertion is the process of pushing a cryptographic challenge to the authenticator, which will return back to the server signed by the private key of the device. Upon arrival, the server checks the signature is correct with the stored public key, ready to log in.

The private key doesn't leave the authenticator, there are no shared passwords stored anywhere, and Passkeys only work on the server domain (like google.com) or subdomain (like auth.google.com).

Set up

We need to make sure your users can register their devices and authenticate with them.

  1. Publish the files
  2. Add the WebAuthn driver
  3. Implement the contract and trait
  4. Register the controllers (optional)
  5. Use the Javascript helper (optional)

1. Add the WebAuthn driver

Laragear WebAuthn works by extending the Eloquent User Provider with a simple additional check to find a user for the given WebAuthn Credentials (Assertion). This makes this WebAuthn package compatible with any guard you may have.

Simply go into your auth.php configuration file, change the driver from eloquent to eloquent-webauthn, and add the password_fallback to true.

return [
    // ...

    'providers' => [
        'users' => [
            'driver' => 'eloquent-webauthn',
            'model' => App\User::class,
            'password_fallback' => true,
        ],
    ]
];

The password_fallback indicates the User Provider should fall back to validate the password when the request is not a WebAuthn Assertion. It's enabled to seamlessly use both classic (password) and WebAuthn authentication procedures.

2. Publish files and migrate

With the single webauthn:install command, you can install the configuration, routes, and migration files.

php artisan webauthn:install

This will also publish a migration file needed to create a table to hold the WebAuthn Credentials (Passkeys). Once ready, migrate your application to create the table.

php artisan migrate

Tip

You can modify the migration if you need to, like changing the table name.

3. Implement the contract and trait

Add the WebAuthnAuthenticatable contract and the WebAuthnAuthentication trait to the User class, or any other that uses authentication.

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Foundation\Auth\User as Authenticatable;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Contracts\WebAuthnAuthenticatable;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\WebAuthnAuthentication;

class User extends Authenticatable implements WebAuthnAuthenticatable
{
    use WebAuthnAuthentication;

    // ...
}

From here you're ready to work with WebAuthn Authentication. The following steps will help you close the gap to a full implementation.

4. Register the routes and controllers

WebAuthn uses exclusive routes to register and authenticate users. Creating these routes and controller may be cumbersome, specially if it's your first time in the WebAuthn realm, so these are installed automatically at Http\Controllers\WebAuthn when using webauthn:install.

Go into your web.php routes file and register a default set of routes with the \Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Routes::register() method. Since WebAuthn doesn't require protection for CSRF/XSRF tokens, you may disable it for these routes.

// web.php
use Illuminate\Foundation\Http\Middleware\VerifyCsrfToken;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Route;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Routes as WebAuthnRoutes;

Route::view('welcome');

// WebAuthn Routes
WebAuthnRoutes::register()->withoutMiddleware(VerifyCsrfToken::class);

Tip

The @laragear/webpass javascript helper supports adding CSRF/XSRF tokens.

The method allows to use different attestation and assertion paths, and even each of the controllers.

use Illuminate\Foundation\Http\Middleware\VerifyCsrfToken;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Routes as WebAuthnRoutes;

WebAuthnRoutes::register(
    attest: 'auth/register',
    assert: 'auth/login'
)->withoutMiddleware(VerifyCsrfToken::class);

[!INFO]

You can also delete the controllers and implement attestation and assertion manually.

5. Use the Javascript helper

This package original Javascript helper has been moved into its own package, called @laragear/webpass. You may use directly in your HTML application by just using JSDelivr CDN:

<head>
    <script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/@laragear/webpass@2/dist/webpass.js" defer></script>
</head>

<body>
    <script async>
        if (Webpass.isUnsupported()) {
            alert("Your browser doesn't support WebAuthn.")
        }
        
        const { success } = await Webpass.attest("/webauthn/register/options", "/webauthn/register")
        
        if (success) {
            window.location.replace("/dashboard")
        }
    </script>
</body>

Alternatively, you may want to include it in your project dependencies if you're using a frontend framework like Vue, React, Angular or Svelte, to name a few.

npm i @laragear/webpass@2

Once done, you may attest and assert the authenticator using the Webpass object:

import Webpass from "@laragear/webpass"

if (Webpass.isUnsupported()) {
    return alert("Your browser doesn't support WebAuthn.")
}

// Create new credentials for a logged in user
const { credential, success, error } = await Webpass.attest("/webauthn/register/options", "/webauthn/register")

// Check the credentials for a guest user
const { user, success, error } = await Webpass.assert("/webauthn/login/options", "/webauthn/login")

The Webpass helper offers more flexibility than just adjusting the WebAuthn ceremony paths. For more information, check the documentation of @laragear/webpass.

Attestation

Attestation is the ceremony to create WebAuthn Credentials. To create an Attestable Response that the user device can understand, use the AttestationRequest::toCreate() form request.

For example, we can create our own AttestationController to create it.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AttestationController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AttestationRequest;

public function createChallenge(AttestationRequest $request)
{
    return $request->toCreate();
}

The device will receive the "instructions" to make a key, and will respond with it. You can use the AttestedRequest form request and its save() method to persist the WebAuthn key if it is valid. The request will automatically return a Validation exception if something fails.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AttestationController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AttestedRequest;

public function register(AttestedRequest $attestation)
{
    $attestation->save();
    
    return 'Now you can login without passwords!';
}

You may pass an array, or a callback, to the save(), which will allow you to modify the underlying WebAuthn Eloquent Model before saving it. For example, we could add an alias for the key present in the Request data.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AttestationController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AttestedRequest;

public function register(AttestedRequest $request)
{
    $request->validate(['alias' => 'nullable|string']);

    $attestation->save($request->only('alias'));
    
    // Same as:
    // $attestation->save(function ($credentials) use ($request) {
    //    $credentials->alias = $request->input('alias');
    // })
}

Important

Both AttestationRequest and AttestedRequest require the authenticated user. If the user is not authenticated, an HTTP 403 status code will be returned.

Attestation User verification

By default, the authenticator decides how to verify user when creating a credential. Some may ask to press a "Continue" button to confirm presence, others will verify the User with biometrics, patterns or passwords.

You can override this using fastRegistration() to only check for user presence if possible, or secureRegistration() to actively verify the User.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AttestationController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AttestationRequest;

public function createChallenge(AttestationRequest $request)
{
    return $request->fastRegistration()->toCreate();
}

Userless/One-touch/Typeless Login

This enables one click/tap login, without the need to specify the user credentials (like the email) beforehand.

For this to work, the device has to save the "username id" inside itself. Some authenticators may save it regardless, others may be not compatible. To make this mandatory when creating the WebAuthn Credential, use the userless() method of the AttestationRequest form request.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AttestationController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AttestationRequest;

public function registerDevice(AttestationRequest $request)
{
    return $request->userless()->toCreate();
}

Important

The Authenticator WILL require user verification on login when using userless(). Its highly probable the user will also be asked for user verification on login, as it will depend on the authenticator itself.

Multiple credentials per device

By default, during Attestation, the device will be informed about the existing enabled credentials already registered in the application. This way the device can avoid creating another one for the same purpose.

You can enable multiple credentials per device using allowDuplicates(), which in turn will always return an empty list of credentials to exclude. This way the authenticator will think there are no already stored credentials for your app, and create a new one.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AttestationController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AttestationRequest;

public function registerDevice(AttestationRequest $request)
{
    return $request->allowDuplicates()->make();
}

Assertion

The Assertion procedure also follows a two-step procedure: the user will input its username, the server will return the IDs of the WebAuthn credentials to use, and the device pick one to sign the response. If you're using userless login, only the challenge is returned.

First, use the AssertionRequest::toVerify() form request. It will automatically create an assertion for the user that matches the credentials, or a blank one in case you're using userless login. Otherwise, you may set stricter validation rules to always ask for credentials.

For example, we can use our own AssertionController to handle it.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AssertionController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AssertionRequest;

public function createChallenge(AssertionRequest $request)
{
    $request->validate(['email' => 'sometimes|email']);

    return $request->toVerify($request->only('email'));
}

After that, you may receive the challenge using the AssertedRequest request object by just type-hinting it in the controller.

Since the authentication is pretty much straightforward, you only need to check if the login() method returns the newly authenticated user or null when it fails. When it's a success, it will take care of regenerating the session for you.

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AssertionController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AssertedRequest;

public function createChallenge(AssertedRequest $request)
{
    $user = $request->login();
    
    return $user 
        ? response("Welcome back, $user->name!");
        : response('Something went wrong, try again!');
}

If you need greater control on the Assertion procedure, you may want to Assert manually.

Assertion User Verification

In the same style of attestation user verification, the authenticator decides if it should verify the user on login or not.

You may only require the user presence with fastLogin(), or actively verify the user with secureLogin().

// app\Http\Controllers\WebAuthn\AssertionController.php
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Http\Requests\AssertionRequest;

public function createChallenge(AssertionRequest $request)
{
    $request->validate(['email' => 'sometimes|email']);

    return $request->fastLogin()->toVerify($request->only('email'));
}

Password Fallback

By default, the eloquent-webauthn can be used to log in users with passwords when the credentials are not a WebAuthn JSON payload. This way, your normal Authentication flow is unaffected:

// app\Http\Controllers\Auth\LoginController.php
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Auth;

public function login(Request $request)
{
    $request->validate(['email' => 'required|email', 'password' => 'required|string']);

    if (Auth::attempt($request->only('email', 'password'))) {
        return redirect()->home();
    }
    
    return back()->withErrors(['email' => 'No user found with these credentials']);
}

You may disable the fallback to only allow WebAuthn authentication by setting password_fallback to false. This may force you to handle classic user/password using a separate guard.

Detecting Cloned Credentials

During assertion, the package will automatically detect if a Credential has been cloned by comparing how many times the user has logged in with it.

If it's detected as cloned, the Credential is disabled, a CredentialCloned event is fired, and the Assertion gets denied.

You can use the event to warn the user:

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Event;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Events\CredentialCloned;
use App\Notifications\SecureYourDevice;

Event::listen(CredentialCloned::class, function ($cloned) {
    $notification = new SecureYourDevice($cloned->credential);
    
    $cloned->credential->user->notify($notification);
});

Managing Credentials

The purpose of the WebAuthnAuthenticatable contract is to allow managing credentials within the User instance. The most useful methods are:

  • webAuthnData(): Returns the non-variable WebAuthn user data to create credentials.
  • flushCredentials(): Removes all credentials. You can exclude credentials by their id.
  • disableAllCredentials(): Disables all credentials. You can exclude credentials by their id.
  • makeWebAuthnCredential(): Creates a new WebAuthn Credential instance.
  • webAuthnCredentials(): One-to-Many relation to query for WebAuthn Credentials.

You can use these methods to, for example, find a credential to blacklist, or disable WebAuthn completely by flushing all registered devices.

Events

The following events are fired by this package, which you can hook into in your application:

Event Description
CredentialCreated An User has registered a new WebAuthn Credential through Attestation.
CredentialEnabled A disabled WebAuthn Credential was enabled using enable().
CredentialDisabled A enabled WebAuthn Credential was disabled using disable().
CredentialCloned A WebAuthn Credential was detected as cloned dring Assertion.

Manually Attesting and Asserting

If you want to manually Attest and Assert users, you may instance their respective pipelines used for both WebAuthn Ceremonies:

Pipeline Description
AttestationCreator Creates a request to create a WebAuthn Credential.
AttestationValidator Validates a response with the WebAuthn Credential and stores it.
AssertionCreator Creates a request to validate a WebAuthn Credential.
AssertionValidator Validates a response for a WebAuthn Credential.

All of these pipelines require the current Request to work, as is used to generate Challenges in the Session and validate different parts of the authentication data.

For example, you may manually authenticate a user with its WebAuthn Credentials AssertionValidator pipeline. We can just type-hint a pipeline in a Controller action argument and Laravel will automatically inject the instance to it.

use Laragear\WebAuthn\Assertion\Validator\AssertionValidation;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Assertion\Validator\AssertionValidator;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Auth;

public function authenticate(Request $request, AssertionValidator $assertion)
{
    $credential = $assertion
        ->send(new AssertionValidation($request))
        ->thenReturn()
        ->credential;
    
    Auth::login($credential->user);
    
    return "Welcome aboard, {$credential->user->name}!";
}

Since these are Laravel Pipelines, you're free to push additional pipes. These pipes can be a class with handle(), or just a function that receives the validation procedure.

use Laragear\WebAuthn\Assertion\Validator\AssertionValidator;
use Exception;

public function authenticate(Request $request, AssertionValidator $assertion)
{
    $credential = $assertion
        ->send(new AssertionValidation($request))
        // Add new pipes to the validation.
        ->pipe(function($validation, $next) {
            if ($validation->user?->isNotAwesome()) {
                throw new Exception('The user is not awesome');
            }

            return $next($validation);
        })
        ->thenReturn()
        ->credential;
    
    Auth::login($credential->user);
    
    return "Welcome aboard, {$credential->user->name}!";
}

Warning

The pipes list and the pipes themselves are not covered by API changes, and are marked as internal. These may change between versions without notice.

Migrations

This package comes with a migration file that extends a special class that takes most of the heavy lifting for you. You only need to create additional columns if you need to.

use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Database\WebAuthnCredentialsMigration;

return new class extends WebAuthnCredentialsMigration {
    /**
     * Modify the migration for the WebAuthn Credentials.
     */
    public function modifyMigration(Blueprint $table): void
    {
        // You may add here your own columns...
        //
        // $table->string('device_name')->nullable();
        // $table->string('device_type')->nullable();
        // $table->timestamp('last_login_at')->nullable();
    }
};

If you need to modify the table, or adjust the data, after is created or before is dropped, you may use the afterUp() and beforeDown() methods of the migration file, respectively.

use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Database\WebAuthnCredentialsMigration;

return new class extends WebAuthnCredentialsMigration {
    // ...
    
    public function afterUp(Blueprint $table): void
    {
        $table->foreignId('device_serial')->references('serial')->on('devices');
    }
    
    public function beforeDown(Blueprint $table): void
    {
        $table->dropForeign('device_serial')
    }
};

UUID or ULID morphs

There may be some scenarios where your authenticatable User is using a different type of primary ID in the database, like UUID or ULID. If this is the case, you may change the morph type accordingly with the $morphType property.

use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Laragear\WebAuthn\Database\WebAuthnCredentialsMigration;

return new class extends WebAuthnCredentialsMigration {

    protected ?string $morphType = 'ulid';
    
    // ...
};

Advanced Configuration

Laragear WebAuthn was made to work out-of-the-box, but you can override the configuration by simply publishing the config file.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Laragear\WebAuthn\WebAuthnServiceProvider" --tag="config"

After that, you will receive the config/webauthn.php config file with an array like this:

<?php

return [
    'relying_party' => [
        'name' => env('WEBAUTHN_NAME', env('APP_NAME')),
        'id'   => env('WEBAUTHN_ID'),
    ],
    'challenge' => [
        'bytes' => 16,
        'timeout' => 60,
        'key' => '_webauthn',
    ]
];

Relying Party Information

return [
    'relying_party' => [
        'name' => env('WEBAUTHN_NAME', env('APP_NAME')),
        'id'   => env('WEBAUTHN_ID'),
    ],
];

The Relying Party is just a way to uniquely identify your application in the user device:

  • name: The name of the application. Defaults to the application name.
  • id: An unique ID the application, recommended to be the site domain. If null, the device may fill it internally, usually as the full domain.

Warning

WebAuthn authentication only work on the top domain it was registered.

Instead of modifying the config file, you should use the environment variables to set the name and ID for WebAuthn.

WEBAUTHN_NAME=SecureBank
WEBAUTHN_ID=auth.securebank.com

Challenge configuration

return [
    'challenge' => [
        'bytes' => 16,
        'timeout' => 60,
        'key' => '_webauthn',
    ]
];

The outgoing challenges are random string of bytes. This controls how many bytes, the seconds which the challenge is valid, and the session key used to store the challenge while its being resolved by the device.

Laravel UI, Jetstream, Fortify, Sanctum, Breeze, Inertia and Livewire

In theory this package should work without any problems with these packages, but you may need to override or redirect the authentication flow (read: override methods) to one using WebAuthn.

There is no support for using WebAuthn with these packages because these are meant to be used with classic user-password authentication. Any issue regarding these packages will be shot down with extreme prejudice.

If you think WebAuthn is critical for these packages, consider supporting this package.

FAQ

  • Does this work with any browser?

Yes. In the case of old browsers, you should have a fallback detection script. This can be asked with the included JavaScript helper in a breeze:

if (WebAuthn.isNotSupported()) {
   alert('Your device is not secure enough to use this site!');
}
  • Does this store the user fingerprints, PINs or patterns in my site?

No. WebAuthn only stores a cryptographic public key generated randomly by the device.

  • Can a phishing site steal WebAuthn credentials and use them in my site to impersonate an user?

No. WebAuthn kills the phishing because, unlike passwords, the private key never leaves the device, and the key-pair is bound to the top-most domain it was registered.

An user bing phished at staetbank.com won't be able to login with a key made on the legit site statebank.com, as the device won't be able to find it.

  • Can WebAuthn data identify a particular device?

No, unless explicitly requested and consented. This package doesn't support other attestation conveyances than none, so it's never transmitted.

  • Are my user's classic passwords safe?

Yes, as long you are hashing them as you should. This is done by Laravel by default. You can also disable them.

  • Can a user register two or more different devices for the same account?

Yes.

  • Can a user register two or more credentials in the same device?

Not by default, but you can enable it.

  • If a user loses his device, can he register a new device?

Yes. If you're not using a password fallback, you may need to create a logic to register a new device using an email or SMS. It's assumed he is reading his email using a trusted device.

  • What's the difference between disabling and deleting a credential?

Disabling a credential doesn't delete it, so it's useful as a blacklisting mechanism and these can also be re-enabled. When the credential is deleted, it goes away forever from the server, so the credential in the authenticator device becomes orphaned.

  • Can a user delete its credentials from its device?

Yes. If it does, the other part of the credentials in your server gets orphaned. You may want to show the user a list of registered credentials in the application to delete them.

  • How secure is this against passwords or 2FA?

Extremely secure since it works only on HTTPS (or localhost). Also, no password or codes are exchanged nor visible in the screen.

  • Can I deactivate the password fallback? Can I enforce only WebAuthn authentication and nothing else?

Yes. Just be sure to create recovery helpers to avoid locking out your users.

  • Does this include JavaScript to handle WebAuthn in the frontend?

It's encouraged to use Webpass package.

Alternatively, for complex WebAuthn management, consider using the navigator.credentials API directly.

  • The attestation is fine, but assertion never logs in the user

This happens because you forgot the first step, using the WebAuthn driver to authenticate users.

  • Does WebAuthn eliminate bots? Can I forget about captchas?

Yes and no. To register users, you still need to use captcha, honeypots, or other mechanisms to stop bots from filling forms.

Once a user is registered, bots won't be able to log in because the real user is the only one that has the private key required for WebAuthn.

  • Does this encode/decode the WebAuthn data automatically in the frontend?

Yes, the Webpass helper does it automatically for you.

  • Does this encrypt the public keys?

Yes, public keys are encrypted when saved into the database with your app key.

  • I changed my APP_KEY and nobody can log in

Since public keys are encrypted with your app key, older public keys will become useless. To change that, create a console command that decrypts (with the old key) and re-encrypts the public_key column of the table where the authentication data is.

  • Does this include WebAuthn credential recovery routes?

No. You're free to create your own flow for recovery.

My recommendation is to email the user, pointing to a route that registers a new device, and immediately redirect him to blacklist which credential was lost (or blacklist the only one he has).

  • Can I use my smartphone as authenticator through my PC or Mac?

Usually.

While this is entirely up to hardware, OS and browser vendor themselves, modern platforms will show a QR code, push notification, or ask to bring closer your smartphone to complete the WebAuthn ceremony. Please check your target platforms of choice.

  • Why my device doesn't show Windows Hello/Passkey/TouchID/FaceID/OpticID/pattern/fingerprint authentication?

By default, this WebAuthn works on almost everything. Some combinations of devices, OS and Web browsers may differ on what to make available for WebAuthn authentication.

You may check this site for authenticator support.

  • Why my device doesn't work at all with this package?

This package supports WebAuthn 2.0, which is W3C Recommendation. Your device/OS/browser may be using an unsupported version.

There are no plans to support older WebAuthn specs. The new WebAuthn 3.0 draft spec needs to be finished to be supported.

  • I'm trying to test this in my development server, but it doesn't work

Use localhost exclusively (not 127.0.0.1 or ::1) or use a proxy to tunnel your site through HTTPS. WebAuthn only works on localhost or under HTTPS only.

  • Why this package supports only none attestation conveyance?

Because direct, indirect and enterprise attestations are mostly used on high-security high-risk scenarios, where an entity has total control on the devices used to authenticate. Imagine banks, medical, or military.

If you deem this feature critical for you, consider supporting this package.

  • Can I allow logins with only USB keys?

No. The user can use whatever to authenticate in your app. This may be enabled on future versions.

  • Everytime I make attestations or assertions, it says no challenge exists!

Remember that your WebAuthn routes must use Sessions, because the Challenges are stored there.

Session are automatically started on the web route group, or using the StartSession middleware directly. You can check this on your HTTP Kernel Middleware.

  • My ceremonies always fail. How I can debug this package?

If you have debugging enabled, like on development environments, the assertion data is logged in your application logs.

The rest of errors are thrown as-is. You may want to log them manually using Laravel's Error Handler depending on the case.

  • Can I publish only some files?

Yes. Instead of using webauthn:install, use vendor:publish and follow the prompts.

  • Why ext-sodium is required as optional?

Some authenticators can create EdDSA 25519 public keys, which are part of W3C WebAuthn 3.0 draft. These keys are shorter and don't require too much computational power to verify, which opens the usage for low-power or "passive" authenticators (like smart-cards).

If sodium or the paragonie/sodium-compat package are not installed, the server won't report EdDSA 25519 compatibility to the authenticator, and any EdDSA 25519 public key previously stored will fail validation.

Consider also that there are no signs of EdDSA 25519 incorporation into PHP ext-openssl extension.

Laravel Octane Compatibility

  • There are no singletons using a stale application instance.
  • There are no singletons using a stale config instance.
  • There are no singletons using a stale request instance.
  • There are no static properties written during a request.

There should be no problems using this package with Laravel Octane.

Security

These are some details about this WebAuthn implementation you should be aware of.

  • Registration (attestation) and Login (assertion) challenges use the current request session.
  • Only one ceremony can be done at a time, because ceremonies use the same challenge key.
  • Challenges are pulled (retrieved and deleted from source) from the session on resolution, independently of their result.
  • All challenges and ceremonies expire after 60 seconds.
  • WebAuthn User Handle is UUID v4.
  • User Handle is reused when a new credential for the same user is created.
  • Credentials can be blacklisted (enabled/disabled).
  • Public Keys are encrypted by with application key in the database automatically, using the application key.

If you discover any security related issues, please email darkghosthunter@gmail.com instead of using the issue tracker.

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.

Contains Code from Lukas Buchs WebAuthn 2.0 implementation. The MIT License (MIT) where applicable.

Laravel is a Trademark of Taylor Otwell. Copyright © 2011-2022 Laravel LLC.