the-matrix/slim-dic-example

A Slim Framework skeleton application utilising Symfony DIC to create a super thin MVC

2.0.3 2016-06-17 06:40 UTC

README

PHP 5.5 PHP 5.6 PHP 7

Use this skeleton application to quickly setup and start working on a new Slim Framework 3 application incorporating the power of the Symfony 2 Dependency Injection component.

This demo also uses Sensio Labs' Twig template library, but you don't have to - use Smarty instead, or native PHP for your view scripts - it's up to you, - just configure the DIC definition files per your requirements. (Don't forget to add/remove dependencies in composer.json if you do.)

Also included is a minimal Controller (MVC) implementation, that allows you to seperate out the routing from the site application logic. Again, you don't need to use it if you don't want to.

This skeleton application was built for Composer. This makes setting up a new Slim Framework application quick and easy. You are not intended to include this as a composer requirement, but to create a new Composer app with it and move on.

This is a PHP5.5+ application

Install Composer

Install [Composer] (https://getcomposer.org/). It is useful to symlink the composer.phar file into /usr/local/bin or your ~/bin directory, dependent on your circumstances e.g.

    cd ~/bin
    ln -s /path/to/composer.phar composer
    chmod u+x composer

Install the Application

After you install Composer, run this command from the directory below the one in which you want to install your new Slimdic application.

composer create-project the-matrix/slim-dic-example \ 2.*

Replace <my-app-name> with the desired directory name for your new application. When the installer asks Do you want to remove the existing VCS (.git, .svn..) history? [Y,n]?

then enter 'Y'.

(NB. If you want the Slim 2 + Symfony 2 version of this library, use 1.* as the version number above.)

The rest of this section comes under the general heading of 'Teaching Grandma to Suck Eggs', but hey - someone out there is a newby!

You'll want to:

  • Point your virtual host document root to your new application's public/ directory.

  • Ensure your web server has rights to your root directory. It needs to be able to read and write to the appropriate directories e.g.

    sudo chgrp -R apache my-app-name
    sudo chmod -R g+r my-app-name
    sudo chmod -R g+w my-app-name/spool

ensures that both you and the server can read and write. NB, check the user name that your server is running under, something like:

    ps aux | grep httpd
    # or
    ps aux | grep apache

normally does the trick.

Have a care for security. Dependent on your server, set the vhost to allow public access to the ./public directory only. The app needs to be able to see everything from one directory below, and no more.

Dependent on how you have set up your vhost, you may need to add an entry to the /etc/hosts file. I like to set each app I'm developing on it's own dns name so typically, I'll add something like

127.0.0.1 my-app.localhost

to /etc/hosts. Obviously, the name needs to match your web server vhost name

Now assuming you've got all that, point your browser at the the vhost name and off you go - you should be seeing a nice page. Now browse to /logon and check out the cool demo logon. It doesn't matter if you get it wrong - the answer will be revealed.

So you did the demo. Now look at the code - it's all in there under the Site directory and in the public/index.php file.

And remember, once you've installed this demo template, you can change it without worrying that a composer update is going to override any code that you write. That will just update any packages you have defined in your composer.json file.

More reading

The Site Directory

Using the Controller

Find more

Check out ZF4 Packages for more packages

History

V1.0.0 Slim 2 + Symfony 2

V2.0.0 Slim 3 + Symfony 2

V2.0.1 Add link to packages

V2.0.2 bug fix from Nigel Greenway

V2.0.3 code clean. readme typos. bug fix from Nigel Greenway