spatie/laravel-package-tools

Tools for creating Laravel packages

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1.16.4 2024-03-20 07:29 UTC

README

Tools for creating Laravel packages

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This package contains a PackageServiceProvider that you can use in your packages to easily register config files, migrations, and more.

Here's an example of how it can be used.

use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\PackageServiceProvider;
use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\Package;
use MyPackage\ViewComponents\Alert;
use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\Commands\InstallCommand;

class YourPackageServiceProvider extends PackageServiceProvider
{
    public function configurePackage(Package $package): void
    {
        $package
            ->name('your-package-name')
            ->hasConfigFile()
            ->hasViews()
            ->hasViewComponent('spatie', Alert::class)
            ->hasViewComposer('*', MyViewComposer::class)
            ->sharesDataWithAllViews('downloads', 3)
            ->hasTranslations()
            ->hasAssets()
            ->publishesServiceProvider('MyProviderName')
            ->hasRoute('web')
            ->hasMigration('create_package_tables')
            ->hasCommand(YourCoolPackageCommand::class)
            ->hasInstallCommand(function(InstallCommand $command) {
                $command
                    ->publishConfigFile()
                    ->publishAssets()
                    ->publishMigrations()
                    ->copyAndRegisterServiceProviderInApp()
                    ->askToStarRepoOnGitHub();
            });
    }
}

Under the hood it will do the necessary work to register the necessary things and make all sorts of files publishable.

Support us

We invest a lot of resources into creating best in class open source packages. You can support us by buying one of our paid products.

We highly appreciate you sending us a postcard from your hometown, mentioning which of our package(s) you are using. You'll find our address on our contact page. We publish all received postcards on our virtual postcard wall.

Getting started

This package is opinionated on how you should structure your package. To get started easily, consider using our package-skeleton repo to start your package. The skeleton is structured perfectly to work perfectly with the PackageServiceProvider in this package.

Usage

In your package you should let your service provider extend Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\PackageServiceProvider.

use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\PackageServiceProvider;
use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\Package;

class YourPackageServiceProvider extends PackageServiceProvider
{
    public function configurePackage(Package $package) : void
    {
        $package->name('your-package-name');
    }
}

Passing the package name to name is mandatory.

Working with a config file

To register a config file, you should create a php file with your package name in the config directory of your package. In this example it should be at <package root>/config/your-package-name.php.

If your package name starts with laravel-, we expect that your config file does not contain that prefix. So if your package name is laravel-cool-package, the config file should be named cool-package.php.

To register that config file, call hasConfigFile() on $package in the configurePackage method.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasConfigFile();

The hasConfigFile method will also make the config file publishable. Users of your package will be able to publish the config file with this command.

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-config

Should your package have multiple config files, you can pass their names as an array to hasConfigFile

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasConfigFile(['my-config-file', 'another-config-file']);

Working with views

Any views your package provides, should be placed in the <package root>/resources/views directory.

You can register these views with the hasViews command.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasViews();

This will register your views with Laravel.

If you have a view <package root>/resources/views/myView.blade.php, you can use it like this: view('your-package-name::myView'). Of course, you can also use subdirectories to organise your views. A view located at <package root>/resources/views/subdirectory/myOtherView.blade.php can be used with view('your-package-name::subdirectory.myOtherView').

Using a custom view namespace

You can pass a custom view namespace to the hasViews method.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasViews('custom-view-namespace');

You can now use the views of the package like this:

view('custom-view-namespace::myView');

Publishing the views

Calling hasViews will also make views publishable. Users of your package will be able to publish the views with this command:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-views

Note:

If you use custom view namespace then you should change your publish command like this:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=custom-view-namespace-views

Sharing global data with views

You can share data with all views using the sharesDataWithAllViews method. This will make the shared variable available to all views.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->sharesDataWithAllViews('companyName', 'Spatie');

Working with Blade view components

Any Blade view components that your package provides should be placed in the <package root>/src/Components directory.

You can register these views with the hasViewComponents command.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasViewComponents('spatie', Alert::class);

This will register your view components with Laravel. In the case of Alert::class, it can be referenced in views as <x-spatie-alert />, where spatie is the prefix you provided during registration.

Calling hasViewComponents will also make view components publishable, and will be published to app/Views/Components/vendor/<package name>.

Users of your package will be able to publish the view components with this command:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-components

Working with view composers

You can register any view composers that your project uses with the hasViewComposers method. You may also register a callback that receives a $view argument instead of a classname.

To register a view composer with all views, use an asterisk as the view name '*'.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasViewComposer('viewName', MyViewComposer::class)
    ->hasViewComposer('*', function($view) { 
        $view->with('sharedVariable', 123); 
    });

Working with inertia components

Any .vue or .jsx files your package provides, should be placed in the <package root>/resources/js/Pages directory.

You can register these components with the hasInertiaComponents command.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasInertiaComponents();

This will register your components with Laravel.

The user should publish the inertia components manually or using the installer-command in order to use them.

If you have an inertia component <package root>/resources/js/Pages/myComponent.vue, you can use it like this: Inertia::render('YourPackageName/myComponent'). Of course, you can also use subdirectories to organise your components.

Publishing inertia components

Calling hasInertiaComponents will also make inertia components publishable. Users of your package will be able to publish the views with this command:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-inertia-components

Also, the inertia components are available in a convenient way with your package installer-command

Working with translations

Any translations your package provides, should be placed in the <package root>/resources/lang/<language-code> directory.

You can register these translations with the hasTranslations command.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasTranslations();

This will register the translations with Laravel.

Assuming you save this translation file at <package root>/resources/lang/en/translations.php...

return [
    'translatable' => 'translation',
];

... your package and users will be able to retrieve the translation with:

trans('your-package-name::translations.translatable'); // returns 'translation'

If your package name starts with laravel- then you should leave that off in the example above.

Coding with translation strings as keys, you should create JSON files in <package root>/resources/lang/<language-code>.json.

For example, creating <package root>/resources/lang/it.json file like so:

{
    "Hello!": "Ciao!"
}

...the output of...

trans('Hello!');

...will be Ciao! if the application uses the Italian language.

Calling hasTranslations will also make translations publishable. Users of your package will be able to publish the translations with this command:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-translations

Working with assets

Any assets your package provides, should be placed in the <package root>/resources/dist/ directory.

You can make these assets publishable the hasAssets method.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasAssets();

Users of your package will be able to publish the assets with this command:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-assets

This will copy over the assets to the public/vendor/<your-package-name> directory in the app where your package is installed in.

Working with migrations

The PackageServiceProvider assumes that any migrations are placed in this directory: <package root>/database/migrations. Inside that directory you can put any migrations.

To register your migration, you should pass its name without the extension to the hasMigration table.

If your migration file is called create_my_package_tables.php.stub you can register them like this:

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasMigration('create_my_package_tables');

Should your package contain multiple migration files, you can just call hasMigration multiple times or use hasMigrations.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasMigrations(['my_package_tables', 'some_other_migration']);

Calling hasMigration will also make migrations publishable. Users of your package will be able to publish the migrations with this command:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-migrations

Like you might expect, published migration files will be prefixed with the current datetime.

You can also enable the migrations to be registered without needing the users of your package to publish them:

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasMigrations(['my_package_tables', 'some_other_migration'])
    ->runsMigrations();

Working with a publishable service provider

Some packages need an example service provider to be copied into the app\Providers directory of the Laravel app. Think of for instance, the laravel/horizon package that copies an HorizonServiceProvider into your app with some sensible defaults.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->publishesServiceProvider($nameOfYourServiceProvider);

The file that will be copied to the app should be stored in your package in /resources/stubs/{$nameOfYourServiceProvider}.php.stub.

When your package is installed into an app, running this command...

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=your-package-name-provider

... will copy /resources/stubs/{$nameOfYourServiceProvider}.php.stub in your package to app/Providers/{$nameOfYourServiceProvider}.php in the app of the user.

Registering commands

You can register any command you package provides with the hasCommand function.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasCommand(YourCoolPackageCommand::class);

If your package provides multiple commands, you can either use hasCommand multiple times, or pass an array to hasCommands

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasCommands([
        YourCoolPackageCommand::class,
        YourOtherCoolPackageCommand::class,
    ]);

Adding an installer command

Instead of letting your users manually publishing config files, migrations, and other files manually, you could opt to add an install command that does all this work in one go. Packages like Laravel Horizon and Livewire provide such commands.

When using Laravel Package Tools, you don't have to write an InstallCommand yourself. Instead, you can simply call, hasInstallCommand and configure it using a closure. Here's an example.

use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\PackageServiceProvider;
use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\Package;
use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\Commands\InstallCommand;

class YourPackageServiceProvider extends PackageServiceProvider
{
    public function configurePackage(Package $package): void
    {
        $package
            ->name('your-package-name')
            ->hasConfigFile()
            ->hasMigration('create_package_tables')
            ->publishesServiceProvider('MyServiceProviderName')
            ->hasInstallCommand(function(InstallCommand $command) {
                $command
                    ->publishConfigFile()
                    ->publishAssets()
                    ->publishMigrations()
                    ->askToRunMigrations()
                    ->copyAndRegisterServiceProviderInApp()
                    ->askToStarRepoOnGitHub('your-vendor/your-repo-name')
            });
    }
}

With this in place, the package user can call this command:

php artisan your-package-name:install

Using the code above, that command will:

  • publish the config file
  • publish the assets
  • publish the migrations
  • copy the /resources/stubs/MyProviderName.php.stub from your package to app/Providers/MyServiceProviderName.php, and also register that provider in config/app.php
  • ask if migrations should be run now
  • prompt the user to open up https://github.com/'your-vendor/your-repo-name' in the browser in order to star it

You can also call startWith and endWith on the InstallCommand. They will respectively be executed at the start and end when running php artisan your-package-name:install. You can use this to perform extra work or display extra output.

use Spatie\LaravelPackageTools\Commands\InstallCommand;

public function configurePackage(Package $package): void
{
    $package
        // ... configure package
        ->hasInstallCommand(function(InstallCommand $command) {
            $command
                ->startWith(function(InstallCommand $command) {
                    $command->info('Hello, and welcome to my great new package!');
                })
                ->publishConfigFile()
                ->publishAssets()
                ->publishMigrations()
               ->askToRunMigrations()
                ->copyAndRegisterServiceProviderInApp()
                ->askToStarRepoOnGitHub('your-vendor/your-repo-name')
                ->endWith(function(InstallCommand $command) {
                    $command->info('Have a great day!');
                })
        });
}

Working with routes

The PackageServiceProvider assumes that any route files are placed in this directory: <package root>/routes. Inside that directory you can put any route files.

To register your route, you should pass its name without the extension to the hasRoute method.

If your route file is called web.php you can register them like this:

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasRoute('web');

Should your package contain multiple route files, you can just call hasRoute multiple times or use hasRoutes.

$package
    ->name('your-package-name')
    ->hasRoutes(['web', 'admin']);

Using lifecycle hooks

You can put any custom logic your package needs while starting up in one of these methods:

  • registeringPackage: will be called at the start of the register method of PackageServiceProvider
  • packageRegistered: will be called at the end of the register method of PackageServiceProvider
  • bootingPackage: will be called at the start of the boot method of PackageServiceProvider
  • packageBooted: will be called at the end of the boot method of PackageServiceProvider

Testing

composer test

Changelog

Please see CHANGELOG for more information on what has changed recently.

Contributing

Please see CONTRIBUTING for details.

Security Vulnerabilities

Please review our security policy on how to report security vulnerabilities.

Credits

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.