drift/dbal

DBAL for ReactPHP on top of Doctrine

0.1.2 2020-07-29 09:07 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2020-09-29 13:16:32 UTC


README

CircleCI

This is a DBAL on top of ReactPHP SQL clients and Doctrine model implementation. You will be able to use

  • Doctrine QueryBuilder model
  • Doctrine Schema model
  • Easy-to-use shortcuts for common operations
  • and much more support is being added right now

Attention. Only for proof of concept ATM. Do not use this library on production until the first stable version is tagged.

Example

Let's create an example of what this library can really do. For this example, we will create an adapter for Mysql, and will use Doctrine QueryBuilder to create a new element in database and query for some rows.

Because we will use Mysql adapter, you should have installed the ReactPHP based mysql library react/mysql. Because this library is on development stage, all adapters dependencies will be loaded for testing purposes.

First of all, we need to create a Connection instance with the selected platform driver. We will have to create as well a Credentials instance with all the connection data.

use Doctrine\DBAL\Platforms\MySqlPlatform;
use Drift\DBAL\Connection;
use Drift\DBAL\Driver\Mysql\MysqlDriver;
use Drift\DBAL\Credentials;
use React\EventLoop\Factory as LoopFactory;

$loop = LoopFactory::create();
$mysqlPlatform = new MySqlPlatform();
$mysqlDriver = new MysqlDriver($loop);
$credentials = new Credentials(
   '127.0.0.1',
   '3306',
   'root',
   'root',
   'test'
);

$connection = Connection::createConnected(
    $mysqlDriver,
    $credentials,
    $mysqlPlatform
);

Once we have the connection, we can create a new register in the database by using the Doctrine QueryBuilder or direct built-in methods. The result of all these calls will be a Promise interface that, eventually, will return a Result instance.

use Drift\DBAL\Connection;
use Drift\DBAL\Result;

/**
* @var Connection $connection
 */
$promise = $connection
    ->insert('test', [
        'id' => '1',
        'field1' => 'val1',
        'field2' => 'val2',
    ])
    ->then(function(Result $_) use ($connection) {
        $queryBuilder = $connection->createQueryBuilder();
        
        return $connection
            ->query($queryBuilder)
            ->select('*')
            ->from('test', 't')
            ->where($queryBuilder->expr()->orX(
                $queryBuilder->expr()->eq('t.id', '?'),
                $queryBuilder->expr()->eq('t.id', '?')
            ))
            ->setParameters(['1', '2']);
    })
    ->then(function(Result $result) {
        $numberOfRows = $result->fetchCount();
        $firstRow = $result->fetchFirstRow();
        $allRows = $result->fetchAllRows();
    });

You can use, at this moment, adapters for mysql, postgresql, and sqlite.

Connection shortcuts

This DBAL introduce some shortcuts useful for your projects on top of Doctrine query builder and escaping parametrization.

Insert

Inserts a new row in a table. Needs the table and an array with fields and their values. Returns a Promise.

$connection->insert('test', [
    'id' => '1',
    'field1' => 'value1'
]);

Update

Updates an existing row from a table. Needs the table, an identifier as array and an array of fields with their values. Returns a Promise.

$connection->update(
    'test',
    ['id' => '1'],
    [
        'field1' => 'value1',
        'field2' => 'value2',
    ]
);

Upsert

Insert a row if not exists. Otherwise, it will update the existing row with given values. Needs the table, an identifier as array and an array of fields with their values. Returns a Promise.

$connection->upsert(
    'test',
    ['id' => '1'],
    [
        'field1' => 'value1',
        'field2' => 'value2',
    ]
);

Delete

Deletes a row if exists. Needs the table and the identifier as array. Returns a Promise.

$connection->delete('test', [
    'id' => '1'
]);

Find one by

Find a row given a where clause. Needs the table and an array of fields with their values. Returns a Promise with, eventually, the result as array of all found rows.

$connection
    ->findOneById('test', [
        'id' => '1'
    ])
    ->then(function(?array $result) {
        if (is_null($result)) {
            // Row with ID=1 not found
        } else {
            // Row with ID=1 found.
            echo $result['id'];
        }   
    });

Find by

Find all rows given an array of where clauses. Needs the table and an array of fields with their values. Returns a Promise with, eventually, the result as array of all found rows.

$connection
    ->findBy('test', [
        'age' => '33'
    ])
    ->then(function(array $result) {
        echo 'Found ' . count($result) . ' rows'; 
    });

Create table

You can easily create a new table with basic information. Needs the table name and an array of fields and types. Strings are considered with length 255. First field position in the array will be considered as primary key. Returns a Promise with, eventually, the connection.

$connection->createTable('test', [
    'id' => 'string',
    'name' => 'string',
]);

This is a basic table creation method. To create more complex tables, you can use Doctrine's Schema model. You can execute all Schema SQLs generated by using this method inside Connection named executeSchema. You'll find more information about this Schema model in Doctrine documentation

$schema = new Schema();
$table = $schema->createTable('test');
$table->addColumn('id', 'string');
// ...

$connection->executeSchema($schema);

Drop table

You can easily drop an existing table. Needs just the table name, and returns, eventually, the connection.

$connection->dropTable('test');

Truncate table

You can easily truncate an existing table. Needs just the table name, and returns, eventually, the connection.

$connection->truncateTable('test');

Tests

You can run tests by running docker-compose up and by doing php vendor/bin/phpunit.