br/signed-request-bundle

Symfony2 Bundle that provides request and response signing

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Language: PHP

0.5.1 2013-07-04 20:59 UTC

README

Symfony 2 bundle that provides request and response signing

Build Status Latest Stable Version SensioLabsInsight

Introduction

This bundle provides very easy request signing (verification), and automatic response signing. This means that every request has to be signed with a hash of

md5($requestUri . $content . $salt)

The response will be signed with:

md5($responseContent . $salt)

The signatures are always put (and assumed) in a header called X-SignedRequest.

Contributions are as always welcome.

Installation

Simply run assuming you have installed composer.phar or composer binary (or add to your composer.json and run composer install:

$ composer require br/signed-request-bundle

You can follow dev-master, or use a more stable tag (recommended for various reasons). On the Github repository, or on Packagist, you can always find out the latest tag.

Now add the Bundle to your Kernel:

<?php
// app/AppKernel.php

public function registerBundles()
{
    $bundles = array(
        // ...
        new BR\SignedRequestBundle\BRSignedRequestBundle(),
        // ...
    );
}

Configuration

To configure the bundle, edit your config.yml, or config_{environment}.yml:

# Signed Request Bundle
br_signed_request:
    salt: SALT_HERE
    debug: %kernel.debug%
    request_listener_enabled: true      # default
    response_listener_enabled: true     # default
    signature_mismatch:                 # optional
        status_code: 400
        response: Failed validation

If you put the listeners into debug mode, the request listener will always pass through the request, it will add a X-SignedRequest-Debug header though, that will either contain "true" or "false" depending on whether the signature was correct.

Providing your own signing service

You can provide your own signing service by tagging your service as br_signed_request.signing_service and implementing the Service\SigningServiceInterface. The bundle will then call the respective functions of your service. You can take a look at the default service that is used (that just uses MD5) to see how it is setup.

Using the signed request / response annotation

Instead of checking every request for a signature you can also add an annotation on a single controller function. In order to use that you would have to set request_listener_enabled to false. The same is true for signing responses. If you disable response_listener_enabled, you can use annotations to specify a controller action that should sign the response. Of course, you can also combine both annotations.

Example

<?php

namespace Acme\YourBundle\Controller;

use BR\SignedRequestBundle\Annotations\SignedRequest;
use BR\SignedRequestBundle\Annotations\SignedResponse;

...

    /**
     * @SignedRequest
     */
    public function fooAction()
    {
        ...
    }

    /**
     * @SignedResponse
     */
    public function barAction()
    {
        ...
    }

    /**
     * @SignedRequest
     * @SignedResponse
     */
    public function bazAction()
    {
        ...
    }
...

To Do & Future plans

None at the moment. Open an issue or submit a PR :)