zenstruck/messenger-test

Assertions and helpers for testing your symfony/messenger queues.

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Type:symfony-bundle

v1.9.1 2023-11-23 15:05 UTC

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Assertions and helpers for testing your symfony/messenger queues.

This library provides a TestTransport that, by default, intercepts any messages sent to it. You can then inspect and assert against these messages. Sent messages are serialized and unserialized as an added check.

The transport also allows for processing these queued messages.

Installation

  1. Install the library:

    composer require --dev zenstruck/messenger-test
  2. Update config/packages/messenger.yaml and override your transport(s) in your test environment with test://:

    # config/packages/messenger.yaml
    
    # ...
    
    when@test:
        framework:
            messenger:
                transports:
                    async: test://

Transport

You can interact with the test transports in your tests by using the InteractsWithMessenger trait in your KernelTestCase/WebTestCase tests. You can assert the different steps of message processing by asserting on the queue and the different states of message processing like "acknowledged", "rejected" and so on.

Note: If you only need to know if a message has been dispatched you can make assertions on the bus itself.

Queue Assertions

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase // or WebTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // ...some code that routes messages to your configured transport

        // assert against the queue
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertEmpty();
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertNotEmpty();
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertCount(3);
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertContains(MyMessage::class); // queue contains this message
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertContains(MyMessage::class, 3); // queue contains this message 3 times
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertContains(MyMessage::class, 0); // queue contains this message 0 times
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertNotContains(MyMessage::class); // queue not contains this message

        // access the queue data
        $this->transport()->queue(); // Envelope[]
        $this->transport()->queue()->messages(); // object[] the messages unwrapped from envelope
        $this->transport()->queue()->messages(MyMessage::class); // MyMessage[] just messages matching class
    }
}

Processing The Queue

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase // or WebTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // ...some code that routes messages to your configured transport

        // let's assume 3 messages are on this queue
        $this->transport()->queue()->assertCount(3);

        $this->transport()->process(1); // process one message
        $this->transport()->processOrFail(1); // equivalent to above but fails if queue empty

        $this->transport()->queue()->assertCount(2); // queue now only has 2 items

        $this->transport()->process(); // process all messages on the queue
        $this->transport()->processOrFail(); // equivalent to above but fails if queue empty

        $this->transport()->queue()->assertEmpty(); // queue is now empty
    }
}

NOTE: Calling process() not only processes messages on the queue but any messages created during the handling of messages (all by default or up to $number).

Other Transport Assertions and Helpers

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Symfony\Component\Messenger\Envelope;
use Symfony\Component\Messenger\Stamp\DelayStamp;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\Transport\TestTransport;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase // or WebTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // manually send a message to your transport
        $this->transport()->send(new MyMessage());

        // send with stamps
        $this->transport()->send(Envelope::wrap(new MyMessage(), [new SomeStamp()]));

        // send "pre-encoded" message
        $this->transport()->send(['body' => '...']);

        $queue = $this->transport()->queue();
        $dispatched = $this->transport()->dispatched();
        $acknowledged = $this->transport()->acknowledged(); // messages successfully processed
        $rejected = $this->transport()->rejected(); // messages not successfully processed

        // The 4 above variables are all instances of Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\EnvelopeCollection
        // which is a countable iterator with the following api (using $queue for the example).
        // Methods that return Envelope(s) actually return TestEnvelope(s) which is an Envelope
        // decorator (all standard Envelope methods can be used) with some stamp-related assertions.

        // collection assertions
        $queue->assertEmpty();
        $queue->assertNotEmpty();
        $queue->assertCount(3);
        $queue->assertContains(MyMessage::class); // contains this message
        $queue->assertContains(MyMessage::class, 3); // contains this message 3 times
        $queue->assertNotContains(MyMessage::class); // not contains this message

        // helpers
        $queue->count(); // number of envelopes
        $queue->all(); // TestEnvelope[]
        $queue->messages(); // object[] the messages unwrapped from their envelope
        $queue->messages(MyMessage::class); // MyMessage[] just instances of the passed message class

        // get specific envelope
        $queue->first(); // TestEnvelope - first one on the collection
        $queue->first(MyMessage::class); // TestEnvelope - first where message class is MyMessage
        $queue->first(function(Envelope $e): bool {
            return $e->getMessage() instanceof MyMessage && $e->getMessage()->isSomething();
        }); // TestEnvelope - first that matches the filter callback

        // Equivalent to above - use the message class as the filter function typehint to
        // auto-filter to this message type.
        $queue->first(fn(MyMessage $m): bool => $m->isSomething()); // TestEnvelope

        // TestEnvelope stamp assertions
        $queue->first()->assertHasStamp(DelayStamp::class);
        $queue->first()->assertNotHasStamp(DelayStamp::class);

        // reset collected messages on the transport
        $this->transport()->reset();

        // reset collected messages for all transports
        TestTransport::resetAll();

        // fluid assertions on different EnvelopeCollections
        $this->transport()
            ->queue()
                ->assertNotEmpty()
                ->assertContains(MyMessage::class)
            ->back() // returns to the TestTransport
            ->dispatched()
                ->assertEmpty()
            ->back()
            ->acknowledged()
                ->assertEmpty()
            ->back()
            ->rejected()
                ->assertEmpty()
            ->back()
        ;
    }
}

Processing Exceptions

By default, when processing a message that fails, the TestTransport catches the exception and adds to the rejected list. You can change this behaviour:

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase // or WebTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // ...some code that routes messages to your configured transport

        // disable exception catching
        $this->transport()->throwExceptions();

        // if processing fails, the exception will be thrown
        $this->transport()->process(1);

        // re-enable exception catching
        $this->transport()->catchExceptions();
    }
}

You can enable exception throwing for your transport(s) by default in the transport dsn:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

# ...

when@test:
    framework:
        messenger:
            transports:
                async: test://?catch_exceptions=false

Unblock Mode

By default, messages sent to the TestTransport are intercepted and added to a queue, waiting to be processed manually. You can change this behaviour so messages are handled as they are sent:

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase // or WebTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // disable intercept
        $this->transport()->unblock();

        // ...some code that routes messages to your configured transport
        // ...these messages are handled immediately

        // enable intercept
        $this->transport()->intercept();

        // ...some code that routes messages to your configured transport

        // if messages are on the queue when calling unblock(), they are processed
        $this->transport()->unblock();
    }
}

You can disable intercepting messages for your transport(s) by default in the transport dsn:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

# ...

when@test:
    framework:
        messenger:
            transports:
                async: test://?intercept=false

Testing Serialization

By default, the TestTransport tests that messages can be serialized and deserialized. This behavior can be disabled with the transport dsn:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

# ...

when@test:
    framework:
        messenger:
            transports:
                async: test://?test_serialization=false

Multiple Transports

If you have multiple transports you'd like to test, change all their dsn's to test:// in your test environment:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

# ...

when@test:
    framework:
        messenger:
            transports:
                low: test://
                high: test://

In your tests, pass the name to the transport() method:

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase // or WebTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        $this->transport('high')->queue();
        $this->transport('low')->dispatched();
    }
}

Support of DelayStamp

Support of DelayStamp could be enabled per transport, within its dsn:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

when@test:
    framework:
        messenger:
            transports:
                async: test://?support_delay_stamp=true

Note

Support of delay stamp was added in version 1.8.0.

Usage of a clock

Warning

Support of delay stamp needs an implementation of PSR-20 Clock.

You can, for example use Symfony's clock component:

composer require symfony/clock

When using Symfony's clock component, the service will be automatically configured. Otherwise, you need to configure it manually:

# config/services.yaml
services:
    app.clock:
        class: Some\Clock\Implementation
    Psr\Clock\ClockInterface: '@app.clock'

Example of code supporting DelayStamp

Note

This example uses symfony/clock component, but you can use any other implementation of Psr\Clock\ClockInterface.

// Let's say somewhere in your app, you register some actions that should occur in the future:

$bus->dispatch(new Enevelope(new TakeSomeAction1(), [DelayStamp::delayFor(new \DateInterval('P1D'))])); // will be handled in 1 day
$bus->dispatch(new Enevelope(new TakeSomeAction2(), [DelayStamp::delayFor(new \DateInterval('P3D'))])); // will be handled in 3 days

// In your test, you can check that the action is not yet performed:

class TestDelayedActions extends KernelTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;
    use ClockSensitiveTrait;

    public function testDelayedActions(): void
    {
        // 1. mock the clock, in order to perform sleeps
        $clock = self::mockTime();

        // 2. trigger the action that will dispatch the two messages

        // ...

        // 3. assert nothing happens yet
        $transport = $this->transport('async');

        $transport->process();
        $transport->queue()->assertCount(2);
        $transport->acknowledged()->assertCount(0);

        // 4. sleep, process queue, and assert some messages have been handled
        $clock->sleep(60 * 60 * 24); // wait one day
        $transport->process()->acknowledged()->assertContains(TakeSomeAction1::class);
        $this->asssertTakeSomeAction1IsHandled();

        // TakeSomeAction2 is still in the queue
        $transport->queue()->assertCount(1);

        $clock->sleep(60 * 60 * 24 * 2); // wait two other days
        $transport->process()->acknowledged()->assertContains(TakeSomeAction2::class);
        $this->asssertTakeSomeAction2IsHandled();
    }
}

DelayStamp and unblock mode

"delayed" messages cannot be handled by the unblocking mechanism, $transport->process() must be called after a sleep() has been made.

Enable Retries

By default, the TestTransport does not retry failed messages (your retry settings are ignored). This behavior can be disabled with the transport dsn:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

when@test:
    framework:
        messenger:
            transports:
                async: test://?disable_retries=false

Note

When using retries along with support_delay_stamp you must mock the time to sleep between retries.

Bus

In addition to transport testing you also can make assertions on the bus. You can test message handling by using the same InteractsWithMessenger trait in your KernelTestCase / WebTestCase tests. This is especially useful when you only need to test if a message has been dispatched by a specific bus but don't need to know how the handling has been made.

It allows you to use your custom transport while asserting your messages are still dispatched properly.

Single bus

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // ... some code that uses the bus

        // Let's assume two messages are processed
        $this->bus()->dispatched()->assertCount(2);

        $this->bus()->dispatched()->assertContains(MessageA::class, 1);
        $this->bus()->dispatched()->assertContains(MessageB::class, 1);
    }
}

Multiple buses

If you use multiple buses you can test that a specific bus has handled its own messages.

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

# ...

framework:
    messenger:
        default_bus: bus_c
        buses:
            bus_a: ~
            bus_b: ~
            bus_c: ~

In your tests, pass the name to the bus() method:

use Symfony\Bundle\FrameworkBundle\Test\KernelTestCase;
use Zenstruck\Messenger\Test\InteractsWithMessenger;

class MyTest extends KernelTestCase
{
    use InteractsWithMessenger;

    public function test_something(): void
    {
        // ... some code that use bus

        // Let's assume two messages are handled by two different buses
        $this->bus('bus-a')->dispatched()->assertCount(1);
        $this->bus('bus-b')->dispatched()->assertCount(1);
        $this->bus('bus-c')->dispatched()->assertCount(0);

        $this->bus('bus-a')->dispatched()->assertContains(MessageA::class, 1);
        $this->bus('bus-b')->dispatched()->assertContains(MessageB::class, 1);
    }
}

Troubleshooting

Detached Doctrine Entities

When processing messages in your tests that interact with Doctrine entities you may notice they become detached from the object manager after processing. This is because of DoctrineClearEntityManagerWorkerSubscriber which clears the object managers after a message is processed. Currently, the only way to disable this functionality is to disable the service in your test environment:

# config/packages/messenger.yaml

# ...

when@test:
    # ...

    services:
        # DoctrineClearEntityManagerWorkerSubscriber service
        doctrine.orm.messenger.event_subscriber.doctrine_clear_entity_manager:
            class: stdClass # effectively disables this service in your test env