tarantool/client

PHP client for Tarantool.

v0.6.0 2019-11-10 21:00 UTC

README

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A pure PHP client for Tarantool 1.7.1 or above.

Features

  • Written in pure PHP, no extensions are required
  • Supports Unix domain sockets
  • Supports SQL protocol
  • Supports user defined types
  • Highly customizable
  • Tested on PHP 7.1-7.4 and Tarantool 1.7-2.3
  • Being used in other open source projects, including Queue, Mapper, Web Admin and more.

Table of contents

Installation

The recommended way to install the library is through Composer:

composer require tarantool/client

In addition, you need to install one of the supported msgpack packages (either rybakit/msgpack.php or msgpack/msgpack-php).

Note that the Decimal type that was added in Tarantool 2.3 is only supported by the rybakit/msgpack.php package. In order to use decimals with this package, you additionally need to install the decimal extension.

Creating a client

The easiest way to create a client is by using the default configuration:

use Tarantool\Client\Client;

$client = Client::fromDefaults();

The client will be configured to connect to 127.0.0.1 on port 3301 with the default stream connection options. Also, the best available msgpack package will be chosen automatically. A custom configuration can be accomplished by one of several methods listed.

DSN string

The client supports the following Data Source Name formats:

tcp://[[username[:password]@]host[:port][/?option1=value1&optionN=valueN]
unix://[[username[:password]@]path[/?option1=value1&optionN=valueN]

Some examples:

use Tarantool\Client\Client;

$client = Client::fromDsn('tcp://127.0.0.1');
$client = Client::fromDsn('tcp://[fe80::1]:3301');
$client = Client::fromDsn('tcp://user:pass@example.com:3301');
$client = Client::fromDsn('tcp://user@example.com/?connect_timeout=5&max_retries=3');
$client = Client::fromDsn('unix:///var/run/tarantool/my_instance.sock');
$client = Client::fromDsn('unix://user:pass@/var/run/tarantool/my_instance.sock?max_retries=3');

If the username, password, path or options include special characters such as @, :, / or %, they must be encoded according to RFC 3986 (for example, with the rawurlencode() function).

Array of options

It is also possible to create the client from an array of configuration options:

use Tarantool\Client\Client;

$client = Client::fromOptions([
    'uri' => 'tcp://127.0.0.1:3301',
    'username' => '<username>',
    'password' => '<password>',
    ...
);

The following options are available:

Name Type Default Description
uri string 'tcp://127.0.0.1:3301' The connection uri that is used to create a StreamConnection object.
connect_timeout integer 5 The number of seconds that the client waits for a connect to a Tarantool server before throwing a ConnectionFailed exception.
socket_timeout integer 5 The number of seconds that the client waits for a respond from a Tarantool server before throwing a CommunicationFailed exception.
tcp_nodelay boolean true Whether the Nagle algorithm is disabled on a TCP connection.
persistent boolean false Whether to use a persistent connection.
username string The username for the user being authenticated.
password string '' The password for the user being authenticated. If the username is not set, this option will be ignored.
max_retries integer 0 The number of times the client retries unsuccessful request. If set to 0, the client does not try to resend the request after the initial unsuccessful attempt.

Custom build

For more deep customisation, you can build a client from the ground up:

use MessagePack\BufferUnpacker;
use MessagePack\Packer;
use Tarantool\Client\Client;
use Tarantool\Client\Connection\StreamConnection;
use Tarantool\Client\Handler\DefaultHandler;
use Tarantool\Client\Handler\MiddlewareHandler;
use Tarantool\Client\Middleware\AuthenticationMiddleware;
use Tarantool\Client\Middleware\RetryMiddleware;
use Tarantool\Client\Packer\PurePacker;

$connection = StreamConnection::createTcp('tcp://127.0.0.1:3301', [
    'socket_timeout' => 5,
    'connect_timeout' => 5,
    // ...
]);

$pureMsgpackPacker = new Packer();
$pureMsgpackUnpacker = new BufferUnpacker();
$packer = new PurePacker($pureMsgpackPacker, $pureMsgpackUnpacker);

$handler = new DefaultHandler($connection, $packer);
$handler = MiddlewareHandler::create($handler,
    new AuthenticationMiddleware('<username>', '<password>'),
    RetryMiddleware::exponential(3),
    // ...
);

$client = new Client($handler);

Handlers

A handler is a function which transforms a request into a response. Once you have created a handler object, you can make requests to Tarantool, for example:

use Tarantool\Client\Keys;
use Tarantool\Client\Request\CallRequest;

...

$request = new CallRequest('box.stat');
$response = $handler->handle($request);
$data = $response->getBodyField(Keys::DATA);

The library ships with two handlers:

  • DefaultHandler is used for handling low-level communication with a Tarantool server
  • MiddlewareHandler is used as an extension point for an underlying handler via middleware

Middleware

Middleware is the suggested way to extend the client with custom functionality. There are several middleware classes implemented to address the common use cases, like authentification, logging and more. The usage is straightforward:

use Tarantool\Client\Client;
use Tarantool\Client\Middleware\AuthenticationMiddleware;

$client = Client::fromDefaults()->withMiddleware(
    new AuthenticationMiddleware('<username>', '<password>')
);

You may also assign multiple middleware to the client (they will be executed in FIFO order):

use Tarantool\Client\Client;
use Tarantool\Client\Middleware\FirewallMiddleware;
use Tarantool\Client\Middleware\LoggingMiddleware;
use Tarantool\Client\Middleware\RetryMiddleware;

...

$client = Client::fromDefaults()->withMiddleware(
    new LoggingMiddleware($logger),
    FirewallMiddleware::allowReadOnly(),
    RetryMiddleware::linear(),
);

Data manipulation

Binary protocol

The following are examples of binary protocol requests. For more detailed information and examples please see the official documentation.

Select

Fixtures

space = box.schema.space.create('example')
space:create_index('primary', {type = 'tree', parts = {1, 'unsigned'}})
space:create_index('secondary', {type = 'tree', unique = false, parts = {2, 'str'}})
space:insert({1, 'foo'})
space:insert({2, 'bar'})
space:insert({3, 'bar'})
space:insert({4, 'bar'})
space:insert({5, 'baz'})

Code

$space = $client->getSpace('example');
$result1 = $space->select(Criteria::key([1]));
$result2 = $space->select(Criteria::index('secondary')
    ->andKey(['bar'])
    ->andLimit(2)
    ->andOffset(1)
);

printf("Result 1: %s\n", json_encode($result1));
printf("Result 2: %s\n", json_encode($result2));

Output

Result 1: [[1,"foo"]]
Result 2: [[3,"bar"],[4,"bar"]]
Insert

Fixtures

space = box.schema.space.create('example')
space:create_index('primary', {type = 'tree', parts = {1, 'unsigned'}})

Code

$space = $client->getSpace('example');
$result = $space->insert([1, 'foo', 'bar']);

printf("Result: %s\n", json_encode($result));

Output

Result: [[1,"foo","bar"]]

Space data

tarantool> box.space.example:select()
---
- - [1, 'foo', 'bar']
...
Update

Fixtures

space = box.schema.space.create('example')
space:create_index('primary', {type = 'tree', parts = {1, 'unsigned'}})
space:format({
    {name = 'id', type = 'unsigned'}, 
    {name = 'num', type = 'unsigned'}, 
    {name = 'name', type = 'string'}
})

space:insert({1, 10, 'foo'})
space:insert({2, 20, 'bar'})
space:insert({3, 30, 'baz'})

Code

$space = $client->getSpace('example');
$result = $space->update([2], Operations::add(1, 5)->andSet(2, 'BAR'));

// Since Tarantool 2.3 you can refer to tuple fields by name:
// $result = $space->update([2], Operations::add('num', 5)->andSet('name', 'BAR'));

printf("Result: %s\n", json_encode($result));

Output

Result: [[2,25,"BAR"]]

Space data

tarantool> box.space.example:select()
---
- - [1, 10, 'foo']
  - [2, 25, 'BAR']
  - [3, 30, 'baz']
...
Upsert

Fixtures

space = box.schema.space.create('example')
space:create_index('primary', {type = 'tree', parts = {1, 'unsigned'}}) 
space:format({
    {name = 'id', type = 'unsigned'}, 
    {name = 'name1', type = 'string'}, 
    {name = 'name2', type = 'string'}
})

Code

$space = $client->getSpace('example');
$space->upsert([1, 'foo', 'bar'], Operations::set(1, 'baz'));
$space->upsert([1, 'foo', 'bar'], Operations::set(2, 'qux'));

// Since Tarantool 2.3 you can refer to tuple fields by name:
// $space->upsert([1, 'foo', 'bar'], Operations::set('name1', 'baz'));
// $space->upsert([1, 'foo', 'bar'], Operations::set('name2'', 'qux'));

Space data

tarantool> box.space.example:select()
---
- - [1, 'foo', 'qux']
...
Replace

Fixtures

space = box.schema.space.create('example')
space:create_index('primary', {type = 'tree', parts = {1, 'unsigned'}})
space:insert({1, 'foo'})
space:insert({2, 'bar'})

Code

$space = $client->getSpace('example');
$result1 = $space->replace([2, 'BAR']);
$result2 = $space->replace([3, 'BAZ']);

printf("Result 1: %s\n", json_encode($result1));
printf("Result 2: %s\n", json_encode($result2));

Output

Result 1: [[2,"BAR"]]
Result 2: [[3,"BAZ"]]

Space data

tarantool> box.space.example:select()
---
- - [1, 'foo']
  - [2, 'BAR']
  - [3, 'BAZ']
...
Delete

Fixtures

space:create_index('primary', {type = 'tree', parts = {1, 'unsigned'}})
space:create_index('secondary', {type = 'tree', parts = {2, 'str'}})
space:insert({1, 'foo'})
space:insert({2, 'bar'})
space:insert({3, 'baz'})
space:insert({4, 'qux'})

Code

$space = $client->getSpace('example');
$result1 = $space->delete([2]);
$result2 = $space->delete(['baz'], 'secondary');

printf("Result 1: %s\n", json_encode($result1));
printf("Result 2: %s\n", json_encode($result2));

Output

Result 1: [[2,"bar"]]
Result 2: [[3,"baz"]]

Space data

tarantool> box.space.example:select()
---
- - [1, 'foo']
  - [4, 'qux']
...
Call

Fixtures

function func_42()
    return 42
end

Code

$result1 = $client->call('func_42');
$result2 = $client->call('math.min', 5, 3, 8);

printf("Result 1: %s\n", json_encode($result1));
printf("Result 2: %s\n", json_encode($result2));

Output

Result 1: [42]
Result 2: [3]
Evaluate

Code

$result1 = $client->evaluate('function func_42() return 42 end');
$result2 = $client->evaluate('return func_42()');
$result3 = $client->evaluate('return math.min(...)', 5, 3, 8);

printf("Result 1: %s\n", json_encode($result1));
printf("Result 2: %s\n", json_encode($result2));
printf("Result 3: %s\n", json_encode($result3));

Output

Result 1: []
Result 2: [42]
Result 3: [3]

SQL protocol

Below is an example of the SQL execute request. For more detailed information and examples please see the official documentation. Note that SQL is supported only as of Tarantool 2.0.

Execute

Code

$result1 = $client->executeUpdate('
    CREATE TABLE users ("id" INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, "email" VARCHAR(255))
');

$result2 = $client->executeUpdate('
    INSERT INTO users VALUES (null, :email1), (null, :email2)
',
    [':email1' => 'foo@example.com'],
    [':email2' => 'bar@example.com']
);

$result3 = $client->executeQuery('SELECT * FROM users WHERE "email" = ?', 'foo@example.com');
$result4 = $client->executeQuery('SELECT * FROM users WHERE "id" IN (?, ?)', 1, 2);

printf("Result 1: %s\n", json_encode([$result1->count(), $result1->getAutoincrementIds()]));
printf("Result 2: %s\n", json_encode([$result2->count(), $result2->getAutoincrementIds()]));
printf("Result 3: %s\n", json_encode([$result3->count(), $result3->getFirst()]));
printf("Result 4: %s\n", json_encode(iterator_to_array($result4)));

Output

Result 1: [1,null]
Result 2: [2,[1,2]]
Result 3: [1,{"id":1,"email":"foo@example.com"}]
Result 4: [{"id":1,"email":"foo@example.com"},{"id":2,"email":"bar@example.com"}]

User defined types

To store complex structures inside a tuple you may want to use objects:

$space->insert([42, Money::EUR(500)]);
[[$id, $money]] = $space->select(Ctiteria::key([42]));

The PeclPacker supports object serialization out of the box, no extra configuration is needed (however note that it doesn't support MessagePack extensions needed for Tarantool decimals to work and it's not compatible with PHP 7.4 yet).

For the PurePacker you will need to write an extension that converts your objects to and from MessagePack structures (for more details, read the msgpack.php's README). Once you have implemented your extension, you should register it with the packer object:

$packer = PurePacker::fromExtensions(new MoneyExtension());
$client = new Client(new DefaultHandler($connection, $packer));

Note

A working example of using the user defined types can be found in the examples folder.

Tests

To run unit tests:

vendor/bin/phpunit --testsuite unit

To run integration tests:

vendor/bin/phpunit --testsuite integration

Make sure to start client.lua first.

To run all tests:

vendor/bin/phpunit

If you already have Docker installed, you can run the tests in a docker container. First, create a container:

./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t client -

The command above will create a container named client with PHP 7.4 runtime. You may change the default runtime by defining the PHP_IMAGE environment variable:

PHP_IMAGE='php:7.3-cli' ./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t client -

See a list of various images here.

Then run a Tarantool instance (needed for integration tests):

docker network create tarantool-php
docker run -d --net=tarantool-php -p 3301:3301 --name=tarantool \
    -v $(pwd)/tests/Integration/client.lua:/client.lua \
    tarantool/tarantool:2 tarantool /client.lua

And then run both unit and integration tests:

docker run --rm --net=tarantool-php -v $(pwd):/client -w /client client

Benchmarks

The benchmarks can be found in the dedicated repository.

License

The library is released under the MIT License. See the bundled LICENSE file for details.