hemp/presenter

Easy Model Presenters in Laravel

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Type:project

v2.1 2019-09-04 19:25 UTC

README

Codeship Status for davidhemphill/presenter

This package makes it fast, fun, and profitable to decorate your Eloquent models for presentation in views, PDFs, CSV files, or anywhere else in your project.

For a little primer on the problems presenters solve, take a look at this article: Presenters in Laravel.

Installation

Install the package via Composer:

composer require hemp/presenter

In Laravel 5.5+, the package's service provider should be auto-discovered, so you won't need to register it. If for some reason you need to register it manually you can do so by adding it to the providers array in config/app.php:

'providers' => [
    // ...
    Hemp\Presenter\PresenterServiceProvider::class,
],

Creating Presenter Classes

You can easily generate a Presenter class by calling the make:presenter Artisan command:

php artisan make:presenter ApiPresenter

This will generate an empty Presenter class inside of app/Presenters.

Customizing Presenter Classes

At their core, presenters are simple classes designed to encapsulate complex or repetitive view logic. What makes hemp/presenter nice is it allows you to attach magic accessors to these Presenter objects all the while allowing for the typical serialization workflow of using regular Model objects and collections. For example, take this ApiPresenter class:

<?php

namespace App\Presenters;

use Hemp\Presenter\Presenter;

class ApiPresenter extends Presenter
{
    public function createdDate() {
        return $this->created_at->format('n/j/Y');
    }

    public function getFullNameAttribute()
    {
        return trim($this->first_name . ' ' . $this->last_name);
    }
}

This class has a custom method createdDate that can be called wherever this Presenter is used. It also has a magic accessor getFullNameAttribute that will be accessible via the Presenter like so: $user->full_name. This works exactly like Eloquent's magic accessors...when the Presenter is serialized into a response (like for a view or API response), these magic accessors will be called and added to the rendered output.

You'll notice we're calling $this->first_name and $this->last_name. These are not available on the Presenter class itself, but are being delegated to the underlying Model instance.

This Presenter might output something like this:

{
  id: 1,
  first_name: "David",
  last_name: "Hemphill",
  created_at: "2016-10-14 12:00:00",
  updated_at: "2016-12-14 12:00:00",
  full_name: "David Hemphill" // The magic accessor
}

Once you have a presented model instance (like inside a Blade view), you can use magic accessors like this:

$presentedUser->full_name;

Or use the methods available on the Presenter itself:

$presentedUser->createdAt();

When outputting the Presenter to an array or JSON, if you'd like each of the rendered attributes to use camelCase formatting instead of the default snake_case formatting, you can set the snakeCase property on your Presenter to false:

class ApiPresenter extends Presenter
{
    public $snakeCase = false;
}

This will cause the rendered output to look like this:

{
  "id": 1,
  "firstName": "David",
  "lastName": "Hemphill",
  "createdAt": "2016-10-14 12:00:00",
  "updatedAt": "2016-12-14 12:00:00",
  "fullName": "David Hemphill"
}

You might like this option if your front-end JavaScript style guide uses mostly camelCased variables.

In addition, you can set the strategy used at runtime using the snakeCase and camelCase setters:

Presenter::make($user, ApiPresenter::class)->snakeCase();
Presenter::make($user, ApiPresenter::class)->camelCase();

Presenting Single Models

There are a number of different ways you can present your Model objects, depending on your personal preferences. For instance, you can use the make factory method of the Presenter class:

$user = User::first();
$presentedUser = Presenter::make($user, ApiPresenter::class);

You can also call the make method on any of your custom Presenter classes, without passing the second argument:

$user = User::first();
$presentedUser = ApiPresenter::make($user);

You may also use the present global function, if that's your jam:

$user = User::first();
$presentedUser = present($user, ApiPresenter::class);

Or you can use the Hemp\Presenter\Presentable trait on your Model. This will allow you to call present on it directly:

use Hemp\Presenter\Presentable;

class User extends \Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model
{
    use Presentable;
}

$presentedUser = User::first()->present(ApiPresenter::class);

Also, when using the Presentable trait, you can specify a default presenter using the defaultPresenter attribute on the Model and then calling present:

use Hemp\Presenter\Presentable;

class User extends \Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model
{
    use Presentable;

    public $defaultPresenter = App\Presenters\ApiPresenter::class;
}

$presentedUser = User::first()->present();

Presenting Collections

You can also create a collection of presented Model objects. One way is to use the static collection method on the Presenter class to present an array of Model objects:

$users = User::all();
$presenter = Presenter::collection($users, ApiPresenter::class);

You can also use the static collection method on any of your custom Presenter classes directly without passing the second argument:

$users = User::all();
$presenter = ApiPresenter::collection($users);

You may also use the present macro on a Collection object:

$presentedUsers = User::all()->present(ApiPresenter::class);

Hiding Model Attributes From Output

There are times you may wish to keep certain keys from being rendered inside your Presenter. You can use the hidden property on the Presenter to keep any default Model attributes from being used in the output:

<?php

namespace App\Presenters;

use Hemp\Presenter\Presenter;

class ApiPresenter extends Presenter
{
    protected $hidden = ['stripe_private_key'];
}

This will keep the underlying Model instance's stripe_private_key attribute from showing in the final output.

You may also specify the visible property on the Presenter to act as a whitelist of attributes that should be shown in the output.

<?php

namespace App\Presenters;

use Hemp\Presenter\Presenter;

class ApiPresenter extends Presenter
{
    protected $visible = ['name', 'email'];
}

Note: If a key is specified in both the hidden and visible properties, then it will be assumed that you want it to be visible in the rendered output.

Support

If you're using this package, I would love to know about it!

If you're having trouble getting something to work when using this package, contact me on Twitter. I'd be glad to help.

If you believe you have found an bug, improvement, or other issue, please report it using the GitHub issue tracker, or fork the repository and submit a pull request.