akaunting/laravel-sortable

Sortable behavior package for Laravel

1.0.6 2022-09-23 10:54 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2022-09-23 11:34:19 UTC


README

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This package allows you to add sortable behavior to models and views. It ships with a trait where you can set the sortable fields and a blade directive to generate table headers automatically.

Getting Started

1. Install

Run the following command:

composer require akaunting/laravel-sortable

2. Publish

Publish configuration

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=sortable

3. Configure

You can change the column sorting settings of your app from config/sortable.php file

Usage

All you have to do is use the Sortable trait inside your model and define the $sortable fields.

use Akaunting\Sortable\Traits\Sortable;
use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Post extends Model
{
    use Sortable;
    ...

    public $sortable = [
        'id',
        'title',
        'author',
        'created_at',
    ];
    ...
}

If you don't define the $sortable array, the Scheme::hasColumn() function is used which runs an extra database query.

Scope

The trait adds a sortable scope to the model so you can use it just before paginate:

public function index()
{
    $posts = Post::query()->sortable()->paginate(10);

    return view('posts.index')->with(['posts' => $posts]);
}

You can set also default sorting field which will be applied when URL is empty.

$posts = $post->sortable(['author'])->paginate(10); // $post->orderBy('posts.author', 'asc')

$posts = $post->sortable(['title'])->paginate(10); // $post->orderBy('posts.title', 'asc')

$posts = $post->sortable(['title' => 'desc'])->paginate(10); // $post->orderBy('posts.title', 'desc')

Blade Directive

There is also a blade directive for you to create sortable links in your views:

@sortablelink('title', trans('general.title'), ['parameter' => 'smile'],  ['rel' => 'nofollow'])

The first parameter is the column in database. The second one is displayed inside the anchor tag. The third one is an array(), and it sets the default (GET) query string. The fourth one is also an array() for additional anchor-tag attributes. You can use a custom URL as 'href' attribute in the fourth parameter, which will append the query string.

Only the first parameter is required.

Examples:

@sortablelink('title')
@sortablelink('title', trans('general.title'))
@sortablelink('title', trans('general.title'), ['filter' => 'active, visible'])
@sortablelink('title', trans('general.title'), ['filter' => 'active, visible'], ['class' => 'btn btn-success', 'rel' => 'nofollow', 'href' => route('posts.index')])

Icon Set

You can use any icon set you want. Just change the icons.wrapper from the config file accordingly. By default, it uses Font Awesome.

Blade Component

Same as the directive, there is also a blade component for you to create sortable links in your views:

<x-sortablelink column="title" title="{{ trans('general.title') }}" :query="['parameter' => 'smile']"  :arguments="['rel' => 'nofollow']" />

Sorting Relationships

The package supports HasOne and BelongsTo relational sorting:

class Post extends Model
{
    use Sortable;
    ...

    protected $fillable = [
        'title',
        'author_id',
        'body',
    ];

    public $sortable = [
        'id',
        'title',
        'author',
        'created_at',
        'updated_at',
    ];

    /**
    * Get the author associated with the post.
    */
    public function author()
    {
        return $this->hasOne(\App\Models\Author::class);
    }
    ...
}

And you can use the relation in views:

// resources/views/posts/index.blade.php

@sortablelink('title', trans('general.title'))
@sortablelink('author.name', trans('general.author'))

Note: In case there is a self-referencing model (like comments, categories etc.); parent table will be aliased with parent_ string.

Advanced Relation

You can also extend the relation sorting feature by creating a function with Sortable suffix. There you're free to write your own queries and apply orderBy() manually:

class User extends Model
{
    use Sortable;
    ...

    public $sortable = [
        'name',
        'address',
    ];

    public function addressSortable($query, $direction)
    {
        return $query->join('user_details', 'users.id', '=', 'user_details.user_id')
                    ->orderBy('address', $direction)
                    ->select('users.*');
    }
    ...

The usage in controller and view remains the same.

Aliasing

You can declare the $sortableAs array in your model and use it to alias (bypass column exists check), and ignore prefixing with table:

public $sortableAs = [
    'nick_name',
];

In controller

$users = $user->select(['name as nick_name'])->sortable(['nick_name'])->paginate(10);

In view

@sortablelink('nick_name', 'nick')

It's very useful when you want to sort results using withCount().

Changelog

Please see Releases for more information what has changed recently.

Contributing

Pull requests are more than welcome. You must follow the PSR coding standards.

Security

Please review our security policy on how to report security vulnerabilities.

Credits

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see LICENSE for more information.