sourcetoad/soapy

A Soap Client built for Laravel.

v2.0.0 2022-03-17 19:08 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2022-11-18 18:32:33 UTC


README

SOAP is old, but still used. Soapy is modern, but feature limited to fit our use cases.
Heavily inspired by artisaninweb/laravel-soap.

Install

This package is currently supporting Laravel 7.x and Laravel 8.x.

composer require sourcetoad/soapy

This package will use Laravel Auto Discovery to automatically register the Service Provider.

Documentation

Options

  • wsdl - Location to flat file or URL for WSDL.
  • trace - Whether to expose internal methods on SoapClient.
  • cache - Flag to use for WSDL cache.
  • location - Override URL to use for SOAP Requests.
  • uri - Override namespace to use for SOAP Requests.
  • certificate - Certificate path for authentication with Server.
  • options - Array of any settings from SoapClient#options
  • classmap - Array of class maps to map objects -> classes.
  • typemap - Array of type maps. (Documentation WIP)

Example (Class maps)

Creating a client and making a request with class maps.

$this->client = SoapyFacade::create(function (SoapyCurtain $curtain) {
    return $curtain
        ->setWsdl('https://example.org?wsdl')
        ->setTrace(true)
        ->setOptions([
            'encoding' => 'UTF-8'
        ])
        ->setClassMap([
            'Foo' => Foo::class,
            'FooResponse' => FooResponse::class
        ])
        ->setCache(WSDL_CACHE_MEMORY)
        ->setLocation('https://example.org');
});

Presuming you had XML for the expected request like this.

<Foo>
    <bar>Connor</bar>
    <baz>true</baz>
</Foo>

You could produce a matching class to resemble that data.

<?php
class Foo {
    protected $bar;
    protected $baz;
    
    public function __construct(string $bar, bool $baz) {
        $this->bar = $bar;
        $this->baz = $baz;
    }
}

You could then call a fictitious method name "fizz" on the SOAP Class like.

$this->client->call('fizz', new Foo("Connor", true));

This shows the benefit of never messing with XML directly.

Likewise for the response. Imagine you got back this.

<FooResponse>
    <status>Success.</status>
</FooResponse>

This can also be mapped with the following class.

<?php
class FooResponse {
    protected $status;
}

So now you can do:

echo $this->client->call('fizz', new Foo("Connor", true))->status;
// Success.

Example (No Class maps)

This example shows bare minimum WSDL location and no class maps.

$this->client = SoapyFacade::create(function (SoapyCurtain $curtain) {
    return $curtain
        ->setWsdl('https://example.org?wsdl')
});

Presuming you had XML for the expected request like this.

<Foo>
    <bar>Connor</bar>
    <baz>true</baz>
</Foo>

You could then call a fictitious method name "fizz" on the SOAP Class like.

$this->client->call('fizz', [
    'bar' => 'Connor',
    'baz' => true
});

This is more error prone due to human error with keys, but less work.

Example (Custom Client)

Sometimes you may have a SOAP Integration that just isn't fun. It may use something that our default SoapyClient cannot handle. This is okay, because patching a generic SOAP Client for all the strangeness that can happen is not feasible.

Start with a new class, that extends our SoapyBaseClient.

<?php
class CustomClass extends Sourcetoad\Soapy\SoapyBaseClient {
 // 
}

From that class. You can overload any of the functions it provides.

Then pass the class name (fully qualified) to the Curtain during generation.

$this->client = SoapyFacade::create(function (SoapyCurtain $curtain) {
    return $curtain
        ->setWsdl('https://example.org?wsdl')
}, CustomClass::class);