owenmelbz/sashimi

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Eloquent's missing "array" driver.

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Details

github.com/OwenMelbz/sashimi

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owenmelbz
calebporzio

v3.0.1 2020-07-31 11:33 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2021-09-29 02:11:28 UTC


README

Eloquent's missing "array" driver.

Sometimes you want to use Eloquent, but without dealing with a database.

Important Notice

This is a fork of https://github.com/calebporzio/sushi - however it allows you to run Sushi without having a full Laravel installation, allowing you to pull it into other frameworks, it's 90% Celebs code, with additional work-arounds to avoid core Laravel features such as the IoC Container, and global helpers.

Install

composer require owenmelbz/sashimi

Use

Using this package consists of two steps:

  1. Add the \Sashimi\Sushi trait to a model.
  2. Add a $rows property to the model.

That's it.

class State extends Model
{
    use \Sashimi\Sushi;

    protected $rows = [
        [
            'abbr' => 'NY',
            'name' => 'New York',
        ],
        [
            'abbr' => 'CA',
            'name' => 'California',
        ],
    ];
}

Now, you can use this model anywhere you like, and it will behave as if you created a table with the rows you provided.

$stateName = State::whereAbbr('NY')->first()->name;

This is really useful for "Fixture" data, like states, countries, zip codes, user_roles, sites_settings, etc...

Relationships

Let's say you created a Role model, based on an array using Sushi, that looked like this:

class Role extends Model
{
    use \Sashimi\Sushi;

    protected $rows = [
        ['id' => 1, 'label' => 'admin'],
        ['id' => 2, 'label' => 'manager'],
        ['id' => 3, 'label' => 'user'],
    ];
}

You can add a relationship to another standard model, just like you normally would:

class User extends Model
{
    ...

    public function role()
    {
        return $this->belongsTo(Role::class);
    }
}

Assuming the users table has a role_id column, you can do things like this:

// Grab a User.
$user = User::first();
// Grab a Role.
$role = Role::whereLabel('admin')->first();

// Associate them.
$user->role()->associate($role);

// Access like normal.
$user->role;

// Eager load.
$user->load('role');
User::with('role')->first();

Note: There is one caveat when dealing with Sushi model relationships. The whereHas method will NOT work. This is because the two models are spread across two separate databases.

Custom Schema

If Sushi's schema auto-detection system doesn't meet your specific requirements for the supplied row data, you can customize them with the $schema property or the getSchema() method.

class Products extends Model
{
    use \Sashimi\Sushi;

    protected $rows = [
        ['name' => 'Lawn Mower', 'price' => '226.99'],
        ['name' => 'Leaf Blower', 'price' => '134.99'],
        ['name' => 'Rake', 'price' => '9.99'],
    ];

    protected $schema = [
        'price' => 'float',
    ];
}

How It Works

Under the hood, this package creates and caches a SQLite database JUST for this model. It creates a table and populates the rows. If, for whatever reason, it can't cache a .sqlite file, it will default to using an in-memory sqlite database.

Using ->getRows()

You can optionally opt out of using the protected $rows property, and directly implement your own getRows() method.

This will allow you to determine the rows for the model at runtime. You can even generate the model's rows from an external source like a third-party API.

Note: If you choose to use your own ->getRows() method, the rows will NOT be cached between requests.

class Role extends Model
{
    use \Sashimi\Sushi;

    public function getRows()
    {
        return [
            ['id' => 1, 'label' => 'admin'],
            ['id' => 2, 'label' => 'manager'],
            ['id' => 3, 'label' => 'user'],
        ];
    }
}