oblik/kirby-outsource

This package is abandoned and no longer maintained. The author suggests using the oblik/kirby-walker package instead.

Kirby 3 plugin for exporting, importing, and iterating over site content.

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Type:kirby-plugin

3.0.0 2022-10-06 10:18 UTC

README

Plugin that allows you to walk, export, and import all site data according to specified blueprints. It is created with the intention of being used as a dependency for other plugins. Features:

  • Serialize content on a per-field basis (parse YAML in structures, turn comma-separated tags fields to arrays, etc.)
  • Convert KirbyTags to XML and back (for consumption by another API that doesn't understand KirbyTag syntax)
  • Convert Markdown to HTML and back (for APIs that don't work with Markdown)
  • Export entire site, page, and file models
  • Import content using the same schema as the exports
  • Traverse blocks and structures according to their id fields (if they have such)
  • Easy extensibility of the PHP classes for implementing custom behavior
  • Support for the now deprecated Kirby Editor

Installation

With Composer from oblik/kirby-walker on Packagist:

composer require oblik/kirby-walker

Usage

Exporting

You can use the Exporter class to export content:

use Oblik\Walker\Walker\Exporter;

$exporter = new Exporter();
$result = $exporter->walk(page('home'));
echo json_encode($result, JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);
{
    "title": "Home",
    "headline": "Welcome to Kirby's Starterkit",
    "subheadline": "A fully documented example project"
}

Importing

You can use the Importer class to merge input content with the current model content.

use Oblik\Walker\Walker\Importer;

$importer = new Importer();
$model = page('home');
$result = $importer->walk($model, [
	'input' => [
		'headline' => 'Updated headline!'
	]
]);
echo json_encode($data, JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);
{
    "title": "Home",
    "headline": "Updated headline!",
    "subheadline": "A fully documented example project"
}

After merging the data, you can use the resulting array to apply the changes to the model:

kirby()->impersonate('kirby');
$model->update($result);

Options

There are a few options that allow you to transform the raw content to make it more suitable for other systems. Then, the plugin can turn that reformatted content back to its original format, while keeping any changes made to it.

Parse KirbyTags

Turns KirbyTags to XML:

Subheadline: A fully (link: https://getkirby.com/docs/guide text: documented target: _blank) example project
$exporter->walk(page('home'), [
	'options' => [
		'parseKirbyTags' => true
	]
]);
{
    "subheadline": "A fully <kirby link=\"https://getkirby.com/docs/guide\" text=\"documented\" target=\"_blank\"/> example project"
}

By default, KirbyTag attributes are encoded as XML attributes. If the consuming system needs to operate on those values (e.g. translate them), you might need to put their contents out of the tags. Instead of this:

<kirby link="https://getkirby.com/docs/guide" text="documented" target="_blank"/>

…you might need this:

<kirby link="https://getkirby.com/docs/guide" target="_blank">
    <value name="text" index="1">documented</value>
</kirby>

To do this, just use the externalAttributes setting:

$exporter->walk(page('home'), [
	'options' => [
		'parseKirbyTags' => [
			'externalAttributes' => ['text']
		]
	]
]);
{
    "subheadline": "A fully <kirby link=\"https://getkirby.com/docs/guide\" target=\"_blank\"><value name=\"text\" index=\"1\">documented</value></kirby> example project"
}

Parse Markdown

If the consuming system doesn't understand Markdown, you can turn it to HTML:

Text:

# Hello World

This is a fully **documented** example project!
$exporter->walk(page('home'), [
	'options' => [
		'parseMarkdown' => true
	]
]);
{
    "text": "<h1>Hello World</h1><p>This is a fully <strong>documented</strong> example project!</p>"
}

Note: This applies only to textarea field types.

Parse templates

Turns content enclosed in curly braces to XML:

Title: {{ site.title }} Home
$exporter->walk(page('home'), [
	'options' => [
		'parseTemplates' => true
	]
]);
{
    "title": "<meta template=\" site.title \"/> Home"
}

Extending

You can easily extend the base classes to add custom behaviors. For example, you could return the character lengths of each field like so:

use Oblik\Walker\Walker\Walker;

class CustomWalker extends Walker
{
	protected function walkText(string $text, $context)
	{
		return strlen($text);
	}
}

$walker = new CustomWalker();
$data = $walker->walk(page('home'));
echo json_encode($data, JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);
{
    "title": 4,
    "headline": 29,
    "subheadline": 34
}

You could also use values from each field's blueprint:

class CustomWalker extends Walker
{
	protected function walkField(Field $field, $context)
	{
		return $context['blueprint']['label'] ?? 'NONE';
	}
}
{
    "title": "NONE",
    "headline": "Headline",
    "gap": "Gap",
    "subheadline": "Subheadline"
}

The cool part is that parsing YAML for structure fields and JSON for layout and blocks fields is already handled. Your custom logic will work in all nested fields automatically.

Separate logic for field types

You can have different logic for different field types by adding a walkField{{ field type }} method. For example, you can change the behavior for just the gap fields by adding walkFieldGap:

class CustomWalker extends Walker
{
	protected function walkFieldGap($field, $context)
	{
		return 'Mind the gap!';
	}
}
{
    "title": "Home",
    "headline": "Welcome to Kirby's Starterkit",
    "gap": "Mind the gap!",
    "subheadline": "A fully documented example project"
}