laragear/surreal

Use a SurrealDB database in your Laravel application.

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v0.7 2022-10-18 21:46 UTC

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Last update: 2024-06-03 22:17:25 UTC


README

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Use a SurrealDB database in your Laravel application.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$user = DB::connection('surreal')->find('article:1', ['title']);

// [    
//    'title' => 'Let me tell you why SurrealDB is awesome',
// ]

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Requirements

  • PHP 8.1 or better
  • Laravel 9.x

Installation

Set up Composer and require it into your project:

composer require laragear/surreal

Warning Features marked as "planned" are not ready. This documentation puts them as placeholder for tentative implementation.

Configuration

You may set your DB connection in Laravel by creating a new database entry in your config/databases.php. You can copy-paste this example array into the connections key:

'surreal' => [
    'driver' => 'surreal',
    'url' => env('DATABASE_URL', 'ws://localhost:8000/rpc'),
    'ns' => env('DB_NAMESPACE', 'forge'),
    'db' => env('DB_DATABASE', 'forge'),
    'user' => env('DB_USERNAME', 'forge'),
    'password' => env('DB_PASSWORD', 'forge'),
],

As you can guess, Laragear Surreal uses the JSON-RPC (WebSockets) endpoint thanks to amphp v3.

Note You may start SurrealDB matching the configuration in your terminal using forge in your local development:

surreal start --log debug --user forge --pass forge

WebSockets

Since PHP is a single thread engine, a single connection is made for each application instance and, once the app terminates, the connection is closed. During the app lifetime, multiple queries are executed in SurrealDB within a single connection.

If you're using Laravel Octane or similar, the connection is severed once the instance is terminated, not when the app lifecycle ends, which avoids the connection overhead.

Read-only connection

Currently, Laragear Surreal doesn't support using a different connection for read and another for write. You're encouraged to:

  • use a scoped user with only read operations.
  • start SurrealDB on Distributed Mode to leverage persistence and performance, which makes the usage of different connections unnecessary.

Migrations

SurrealDB is meant to be used as a schemaless document store, like NoSQL or Redis, but you may enforce a schema over a particular table. While there is no need to create migrations to store and retrieve data, you may want your data to strictly comply with a table schema or SurrealDB's strict mode.

surreal start --log debug --user forge --pass forge --strict

SurrealDB v1.0 supports the following kinds of data models.

Data Model Description
any($name) Any value type, leaving the cast at query time or app
array($name) Ordered lists with any depth or value types
boolean($name) Both true or false
datetime($name) Any date and time representation
decimal($name) String representation of a decimal number
duration($name) Duration (interval) of time
float($name) Double precision (IEEE 754-2008) floating point number
integer($name) A 64-bit integer
number($name) Auto-detected numeric value, like an integer or a float
object($name) Unordered list with keys and any depth or value type
record($name, ...table) A list of accepted record links separated by comma
geoJson($name, ...type) A list of accepted GeoJSON types separated by comma

All of these data models can be null. It's up to the application to set a value or not.

To see what's like in action, let's make a schema to store articles. The table will automatically reserve id for the primary key.

use App\Models\User;
use App\Models\Tag;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;

Schema::create('article', function (Blueprint $table) {
    $table->string('title');
    $table->any('slug')->default('<future> { string::slug(title) }')
    $table->string('body');
    $table->array('tags');
    $table->record('tags.*.tag', Tag::class); // Allow each "tags" member to be linked to a Tag.
    $table->record('author', User::class); // Allow the "user" attribute to be linked to the author.
    $table->softDeletes();
    $table->timestamps();
});
DEFINE TABLE article SCHEMAFULL;
DEFINE FIELD title ON article TYPE string;
DEFINE FIELD slug ON article TYPE any VALUE <future> { string::slug(title) };
DEFINE FIELD body ON article TYPE string;
DEFINE FIELD tags ON article TYPE array;
DEFINE FIELD tags.*.tag ON article TYPE record(tag);
DEFINE FIELD user ON article TYPE record(user);
DEFINE FIELD deleted_at ON article TYPE datetime;
DEFINE FIELD updated_at ON article TYPE datetime;
DEFINE FIELD created_at ON article TYPE datetime;

Warning Durations in Surreal don't support months, and are not ISO 8601 compatible. You may use any DateInterval or CarbonInterval instance without months, or save an ISO 8601 string and apply the interval in your app.

Primary Keys

All tables in SurrealDB come with a primary key, which is set as id in the record itself — this is not negotiable. There is no need to add a primary key, and doing so will return an error.

When creating records, the primary key will be set using table:id notation. If not set by yourself, SurrealDB creates it as a 20-character random string.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::connection('surreal')->table('article')->insert([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   'body' => '...',
   'tags' => null,
   'user' => null
])
{
    "id": "article:2n5xte3rxl4emiwhgs15",
    "title": "My vacations in Italy",
    "body": "...",
    "tags": null,
    "user": null
}

Alternatively, you can create a record with its ID directly by using id();

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::connection('surreal')->id('article:1')->insert([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   // ...
])
{
    "id": "article:1",
    "...": "..."
}

Note Currently, SurrealDB doesn't support sequential integers, but is planned by SurrealDB.

Database assertions (planned)

Fields on tables support assertions at query-time when a value is inserted or updated. These assertions allow the query to fail completely if the value is not what is expected.

To use assertions, simply use assert() with the raw assertion. The value to insert into the data model is $value, and it should return true to allow the whole row being persisted.

For example, you may define the field email and assert that the value is an email with is::email($value).

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;

Schema::create('user', function (Blueprint $table) {
    // ...

    $table->string('email')->assert('is::email($value)');
    $table->integer('age')->assert('$value > 18');
});

// DEFINE TABLE user SCHEMAFULL;
// DEFINE FIELD email ON user TYPE string ASSERT is::email($value);
// DEFINE FIELD age ON user TYPE integer ASSERT $value > 18;

JSON

If you need to operate over JSON, like over array lengths or object values, you should set the column using any(), object() or array() instead of json() or jsonb(). The JSON-related column types will create a string rather than accessible JSON, and will be considered as a string for all matters.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;

Schema::create('player', function (Blueprint $table) {
    // ...

    $table->any('teams');
    $table->array('positions');
    $table->object('stats');
    $table->json('plain_text');
});
DEFINE TABLE player SCHEMAFULL;
DEFINE FIELD teams ON player TYPE any;
DEFINE FIELD positions ON player TYPE array;
DEFINE FIELD stats ON player TYPE object;
DEFINE FIELD plain_text ON player TYPE string;

Warning Because of the above, all JSON operations, like whereJsonContains(), are unsupported because there is no need to.

Basic Operations

This database driver should work with INSERT, SELECT, UPDATE, and DELETE operations, which are standard in SQL and SurrealDB understands.

Select

Selects can proceed as normal. SurrealDB extends the normal SELECT clause with a few goodies to make queries more convenient.

Selecting by a primary key

You can use find() directly on a query builder with the record ID if your default driver is surreal.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$article = DB::find('article:2n5xte3rxl4emiwhgs15', ['*']);
// SELECT * FROM article:2n5xte3rxl4emiwhgs15

Fetch

You can fetch related records using the fetch method and the attributes that contain the relations. This saves multiple queries into one.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

// Get his account, and the all the users for the given account. 
DB::table('user:tobie')->fetch('account', 'account.users')->first();

// SELECT * FROM user:tobie FETCH account, account.users
{
    "id": "user:tobie",
    "name": "Tobie",
    "account": {
        "id": "account:family",
        "users": [
            {
                "id": "user:tobie",
                "name": "Tobie"
            },
            {
                "id": "user:ana",
                "name": "Ana"
            }
        ]
    }
}

Since fetch() returns all the attributes of the fetched record, you may use select() to filter down the related records attributes.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

// Get his account, and the all the users for the given account. 
DB::table('user:tobie')->fetch('account', 'account.users')->first([
    'user.name', 'user.age', 'user.account.expiration' , 'user.account.users.*.name'
]);

// SELECT user.name, user.age, user.account.expiration, user.account.users.*.name
//     FROM user:tobie
//     FETCH account, account.users

Joins

SurrealDB doesn't have supports for JOIN clauses because there is no need. Records can be related to others from the ground up by using their ID as value.

Distinct

SurrealDB doesn't support DISTINCT clauses, mainly because GROUP BY offers the same results and is more flexible to work with.

Having

SurrealDB doesn't support HAVING clauses. You can create sub-queries almost anywhere to suit your needs.

Insert

A noticeable change from the default insert() method of the builder is that it will always return the whole record final state instead of just a boolean.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$article = DB::id('article:trip-to-italy')->insert([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   'body' => '...',
   'tags' => null,
   'user' => null
]);
{
    "id": "article:trip-to-italy",
    "title": "My vacations in Italy",
    "body": "...",
    "tags": null,
    "user": null
}

Inserts don't support return, timeout or parallel flags.

Create

To create a single record into the database, you can use create(). It works the same as insert(), but it supports return, timeout and parallel flags.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$article = DB::id('article:trip-to-italy')->returnNone()->create([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   'body' => '...',
   'tags' => null,
   'user' => null
]);

Updates

Same case as creation, the whole updated record is returned.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$article = DB::id('article:trip-to-italy')->returnNone()->create([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   'body' => '...',
   'tags' => null,
   'user' => null
]);

You can also upsert a record.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$article = DB::id('article:trip-to-italy')->upsert([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   'body' => '...',
   'tags' => null,
   'user' => null
], 'id', ['user' => 'user:1']);

Note Upsert in SurrealDB is only done when the primary key is duplicated.

Deletes

Deletes work as expected, but with the added possibility of returning the deleted record.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$deleted = DB::id('article:trip-to-italy')->return('before')->delete();

Returns

All operations return the whole records affected, except for deletions, which is very useful to know the final state of each record after a change, but it may consume too much memory when left unchecked.

For all write operations, you can use returnNone() to avoid SurrealDB returning the data affected. For example, we can create a new article and not receive the new state from the database.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$none = DB::table('article:trip-to-italy')->returnNone()->insert([
   'title' => 'My vacations in Italy',
   'body' => '...',
   'tags' => null,
   'user' => null
]);

You can also use multiple return types supported by SurrealDB:

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

// Don't return anything
DB::table('article:trip-to-italy')->return('none')->insert([/** ... */]);

// Return only the attributes that changed.
$diff = DB::table('article:trip-to-italy')->return('diff')->update([/** ... */]);

// Return only the record before it changed.
$before = DB::table('article:trip-to-italy')->return('before')->update([/** ... */]);

// Return the record after it changed.
$after = DB::table('article:trip-to-italy')->return('after')->update([/** ... */]);

// Return some fields of the updated record.
$some = DB::table('article:trip-to-italy')->return(['title', 'body'])->update([/** ... */]);

Timeouts

Timeout allows to kill entire queries that may take too much to process, like large updates or massive deletions. Setting a timeout treats the operation as a transaction, and it will be rolled back if it exceeds the defined duration.

Just use timeout() with the number of seconds to limit the operation execution.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

// Cancel everything if the update takes more than 5 seconds.
DB::table('user')->timeout(5)->update([
    'age' => 24
]);
// UPDATE user CONTENT {
//   age: 24
// } TIMEOUT 5s

Parallel

If you're confident that a record interconnected with others can be retrieved faster, use the parallel() method, which signals SurrealDB to parallelize the retrieval of edges.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::table('user:tobie')->parallel()->first('->purchased->product<-purchased<-person->purchased->product.*');
// SELECT ->purchased->product<-purchased<-person->purchased->product.* FROM user:tobie PARALLEL

Parallel operations can also be done for updating, inserting, creating, deleting and relating.

Note Parallel operations performance are left to SurrealDB.

Casting (planned)

You can manually cast a value from and to the record using special Casting classes. The casting works at database level, before JSON encoding/decoding.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Cast;

DB::table('user:tobie')->get([
    '*', Cast::bool('registered_at', 'can_see'),
]);

// SELECT *, <bool> registered_at AS can_see FROM user:tobie
//
// {
//     "id": "user:tobie",
//     "name": "John",
//     "registered_at": "2020-01-01 19:30:35",
//     "can_see": true,
// }

Futures (planned)

Futures are properties that are computed only when the attributes are returned from a query. You may think of them as embedded queries inside a record attribute.

To create a Future, simple use Future::be() with the raw query to execute.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Future;

DB::table('person')->insert([
    'name' => 'Jason',
    'friends' => ['person:tobie', 'person:jaimie']
    'adult_friends' => Future::be('friends[WHERE age > $?].name', [18])
});
CREATE person CONTENT {
    "name": 'Jason',
    "friends": [person:tobie, person:jaime],
    "adult_friends": <future> { friends[WHERE age > 18].name }
}

In the example above, the adults_friends will always return a list of names from the friends list of the record that are over 18 old.

You may also create Future from queries by using asFuture() instead of executing it.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Future;

DB::table('article')->insert([
    'title' => 'Great places to visit',
    'body' => 'Italy, Spain, and London',
    'category' => 'trips',
    'related_articles' => DB::from('article')->where('category', 'trips')->latest()->limit(3)->asFuture()
});
CREATE article CONTENT {
    "title": 'Great places to visit',
    "body": 'Italy, Spain, and London',
    "category": 'trips',
    "related_articles": <future> { SELECT * FROM article WHERE category = 'trips' ORDER BY created_at LIMIT 3 }
};

Geometries (planned)

You can conveniently create GeoJSON objects using the Geometry class instance. All geometry types in SurrealDB are supported.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Types\Geometry;

DB::table('address')->insert([
    'title' => 'My home',
    'location' => Geometry::point(-36.02010, 146.42279),
});

Variables (planned)

To store a parameter for using in the next query, use let() with the name and value of the variables to pass, or an array. To reference the key, append $ to it.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::table('person')->let([
    'name' => 'tobie',
    'adults_friends' => DB::table('person')->where('age', '>', 18),
])->insert([
    'name' => '$name',
    'friends' => '$adults_friends',
]);
LET $name = "tobie";
LET $adults = (SELECT * FROM person WHERE age > 18);

CREATE person CONTENT {
    "name": $name,
    "friends": $adult_friends
}

Warning Always use named variables instead of numbers. Laragear Surreal uses $1 type variables for the query bindings.

Async queries (planned)

Laragear Surreal driver support executing a query without waiting for the results until later in your code, which can yield massive performance improvements. Simply use async() in the query you want to execute, which will wrap the operation into a promise that you can resolve later.

Since Async Queries don't wait for the result, you can use them to one-off inserting data.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Future;

DB::table('user')
    ->where('age', '>', 18)
    ->async()
    ->returnNone()
    ->update(['is_adult' => Future::be('age > 18')]);

Also, you can use to warm-up queries that may be taxing to retrieve with cursor().

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Future;

$popularArticles = DB::table('article')->has('comments', '>', 100)->cursor();

// Later in your code...

foreach ($popularArticles as $article) {
    // ...
}

Warning The async response from SurrealDB is not resolved until requested, and that includes errors.

Functions

Functions are procedures to execute at query time. You can use any function available in SurrealDB with the Func object in your query.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Func;

$http = Func::http()->get('https://supermarket.com/api', [
    'x-my-header': 'some unique string'
]);

DB::table($http)->get();
SELECT * FROM http::get('https://supermarket.com/api', {
    'x-my-header': 'some unique string'
})

Functions work only at root level. When using functions on nested items, like an array or an object, these will be cast into raw SurrealSQL.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Func;

DB::id('user:john')->create([
    'name' => 'john',
    'email' => 'john@app.com',
    'is_admin' => Func::str()->endsWith('email', '@app.com'),
    'favorites' => [
        'colors' => Func::rand()->enum('blue', 'red'),
        'numbers' => Func::rand()->enum(3, 5, 7)
    ]
]);
CREATE user:john CONTENT {
    'name' => 'john',
    'email' => 'john@app.com',
    'is_admin' => string::endsWith("email", "@app.com"),
    'favorites' => [
        'colors' => rand::enum(blue, red),
        'numbers' => rand::enum(3, 5, 7)
    ]
}

Danger Functions, by all means, are considered raw expressions. Do not use them with user generated content, as you may risk your application to SQL Injection attacks.

Javascript Functions

You can also use Func::js() to execute ES2020-compliant javascript in any part of the query by just setting the function body.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Laragear\Surreal\Query\Func;

DB::table('something')->insert([
    'scores' => Func::js('return [1,2,3].map(v => v * 10)')
]);
INSERT something CONTENT {
    scores: function () { 
        return [1,2,3].map(v => v * 10)
    }
}

Note Script functions are useful features, but try not to abuse them because they can be tricky to debug. You're always a browser away to test a script.

Multiple Queries (planned)

SurrealDB allows for multiple queries run through a single statement.

For example, you may request one user from the database, and the latest three articles from the article table. Instead of running each query separately, you may use the pool method, which will execute all queries in a single request and return the result of each one.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

$queries = DB::connection('surreal')->pool(fn ($surreal) => [
    $surreal->as('user')->from('user:1')->first(),
    $surreal->user('articles')->table('article')->where('author', 'user:1')->latest()->limit(3)->get(),
]);

return [
    $queries['user'], 
    $queries['articles']
];

The queries are resolved synchronously. Once all the queries are returned, you will be able to access to them.

Relationships

SurrealDB breaks the mold on record relationships. If you come from Laravel, you will be pleased to know that relationships come out-of-the-box with SurrealDB: polymorphism is embedded, there is no pivot tables, and Graph Edges are preferred. Let's explain each one.

Polymorphism

A record can be related to another record through its ID. It doesn't matter if the ID is a number, UUID or a random string. This effectively relates a record to any other record on the database.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::table('user')->insert([
    'id' => 'user:1',
    'name' => 'John',
    'favorite' => 'color:red'
]);

DB::table('user')->insert([
    'id' => 'user:2',
    'name' => 'Maria',
    'favorite' => 'team:364gp0m97rv1ynrxphos'
]);

You may define an attribute to abide to only a number of given record types on migrations;

Belongs to Many without pivots

A record can contain an array of related records ID, or an array of objects with related records ID. There is no need to create pivot tables, let alone set up pivot data for each related record.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::table('user')->insert([
    'id' => 'user:1',
    'name' => 'John',
    'favorite_things' => [
        'color:red',
        'team:364gp0m97rv1ynrxphos'
    ],
]);

DB::table('article')->insert([
    'id' => 'article:my-trip-to-italy',
    'title' => 'My trip to Italy',
    'tags' => [
        ['tag' => 'tag:vacation', 'is_primary' => true],
        ['tag' => 'tag:europe', 'is_primary' => false],
    ],
]);

$article = DB::table('article')->where('id', 'article:my-trip-to-italy')->fetch('tags.*.tag')->first();

One drawback is that pivot data only resides on the origin, or the "child" record. To make this data shared between both, you may use Graph Edges.

Graph Edges

You may consider Graph Edges as one-way pivot records. A Graph Edge relates one record to another record, which allows for infinite traversal, keeping data that relates to the far relation relevant to only the origin relation, but accessible to both by switching directions.

Relating records

Using the Query Builder, you can start a relate operation using relatedTo() and executing the statement with through(). You can also use fluent methods to name the Graph Edge dynamically.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::id('user:tobie')->relateTo('user:taylor')->through('knows', ['id' => 1, 'family' => false]);

DB::id('person:1')->relateTo('product:2')->bought(['through' => 'stripe']);
RELATE user:tobie->knows->user:taylor CONTENT {
    id: 1,
    family: false
};

RELATE person:1->bought->product:2 CONTENT {
    through: "stripe"
};

Retrieving Graph Edges

Retrieving the graph edges can be done using a normal select() and the direction of the edges. Since Graph Edges are treated as attributes keys, you should ensure that you want to retrieve all or some attributes from these graphs. These relations are added to the select query, and returning as an array of many parents or children.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

// Retrieve the user, the buying data, and all the products bought.
DB::id('user:tobie')->select('*', '->bought.*', '->bought->product.*')->first();

// Retrieve the product bought, and all the users who bought it
DB::id('product:teddy-bear')->select('*', '<-bought.*', '<-bought<-user.*')->first();
SELECT *, ->bought.*, ->bought->product.* FROM user:tobie

SELECT *, <-bought.*, <-bought<-product.* FROM product:teddy-bear

For more powerful queries, you can use related(). The easiest way to travel Graph Edges is using from() and to() methods, or use the property or method appended with from and to, respectively.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::id('user:tobie')->related()->to('bought')->to('product')->get();

DB::id('product:1')->related()->fromBought->fromUser()->get();
SELECT *, ->bought->product.*, FROM user:tobie

SELECT *, <-bought<-user.*, FROM product:1

We can also use related() to filter the results through a query on each segment. For example, we can filter the 5 most recent products bought through Stripe.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

// Retrieve the last 5 products bought by this user using Stripe.
DB::id('user:tobie')->related()
    ->toBought(fn($query) => $query->where('through', 'stripe'))
    ->toProduct()
    ->latest()->limit(5)->get();
SELECT *, ->(bought WHERE through = "stripe")->product.* 
    FROM user:tobie
    ORDER BY `created_at`
    LIMIT 5

The related() function allows to use an array of Graph Edges to traverse, making possible to retrieve multiple relations in one statement.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::id('user:tobie')->related(
    ['->bought' => fn($query) => $query->where('through', 'stripe'), '->product'],
    ['<-taxes', '<-invoices']
)->get();
SELECT *, ->(bought WHERE through = "stripe")->product.*, <-taxes<-invoices.* 
    FROM user:tobie

Warning Currently SurrealDB doesn't support SELECT statements on edge subqueries. When setting a subquery, SurrealDB will append .* to retrieve all attributes of the far related record.

Bindings

Laravel uses the ? placeholder to signal bindings. While this can work with SurrealDB, it messes with operators like ?= and ?~. For that reason, the placeholder for SurrealDB queries is $?, and default bindings are set with numbers.

When creating a query with bindings manually, you can use $? place the binding to replace.

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;

DB::connection('surreal')->create('CREATE user:1 SET email = $?', ['john@email.com']);

Laravel Octane Compatibility

  • There are no singletons using a stale application instance.
  • There are no singletons using a stale config instance.
  • There are no singletons using a stale request instance.
  • There are no static properties written during a request.

There should be no problems using this package with Laravel Octane.

Roadmap

For this to work elegantly with Laravel, there is still a few tasks remaining to make this driver stable. You can check it out on the Project Roadmap.

If you're interested in a stable release and fuel development, you may become a sponsor.

Security

If you discover any security related issues, please email darkghosthunter@gmail.com instead of using the issue tracker.

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.

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