dnoegel/rules

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Nested rules with php

dev-master 2015-02-23 17:09 UTC

This package is auto-updated.

Last update: 2021-09-04 09:11:24 UTC


README

'Rules' is a simple PHP library which allows you to check nested logical rules. They might come in handy if you need to check user generated rulesets automatically.

Available rules

"Rules" knows two different rule types. Containers (logical operators/junctions) and rules (logical operands).

container rules:

  • AND
  • OR
  • XOR
  • NOT

rules:

  • True
  • False
  • Compare

For your own usage you will certainly add own rules like "user age >= X" or "basket amount >= Y".

Using the rules

Instantiation

You can simply instantiate your rules and nest them like this:

$rule = new AndRule(
    new TrueRule(),
    new OrRule(
        new FalseRule(),
        new TrueRule()
    ),
    new NotRule(
        new FalseRule()
    )
);

$rule->validate();

This will return "true" as the logical expression

true AND (false OR true) AND NOT false

is true.

RuleBuilder

In many cases you want to generate your logical tree from an existing data structure. For this you can use the RuleBuilder:

$builder = new RuleBuilder(new RuleRegistry());

$result = $builder->fromArray(array(
    'and' => array(
        new TrueRule(),
        new TrueRule()
    ),
    'or' => array(
        'false',
        new TrueRule()
    )
));

Using the fromArray() method of the RuleBuilder you are able to pass your rules as a nested array. The rules can be passed by reference (e.g. new TrueRule()) or by name (e.g. "false"). Any sub-array will result in a new container rule from the type of the array key:

array(
    'and' => array()
)

will create a AND container. The above call will result in this rule:

(true AND true) AND (false OR true)

The fromArray() method has a second optional parameter "containerType". By default this is AND. So the logical elements on the first level will be linked with AND.

Own rules

You can create own rules quite easily. For containers you should implement the "container" interface, for simple rules the "rule" interface.

class UserAgeRule implements Rule
{
    protected $user;
    public function __construct($user)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function validate()
    {
        return $this->user->getAge() >= 21;
    }
}

Use this as follows:

$rule = new AndRule(
    new UserAgeRule($currentUser),
    new SomeOtherRule()
)
$rule->validate();

In order to pass current context information to your rule, you should use the constructor of that rule.

RuleRegistry

If you want your rules to be supported by the RuleBuilder, you should register them to the RuleRegistry:

$registry = new RuleRegistry();
$registry->add('age', new UserAgeRule($currentUser));
$registry->add('someOtherRule', new Callback(function() { return new SomeOtherRule(); }));

$builder = new RuleBuilder($registry);
$rule = $builder->fromArray(array(
    'age',
    'someOtherRule'
));
$rule->validate();

There are generally two ways to register your rule: You can register an instance of your object

$registry->add('age', new UserAgeRule($currentUser));

or you can register a callable which returns an instance of your rule:

$registry->add('someOtherRule', new Callback(function() { return new SomeOtherRule(); }));

Registering a callable has some advantages over registering an actual instance:

  • lazy instantiation: your rule will only be created when needed. Especially useful if you need some expensive calculation for your rule
  • context: when used with the RuleBuilder, you will receive the "config" info in the callback function
  • no cloning needed

Rule configuration

Especially if the rules are somehow user generated, you might need some additional configuration. So instead of having a "user is older then 18" rule, you want a "user is older then X" rule. While this is no problem when instantiating the rule objects manually, you might want to have a way, to automatically configure your rule from within the fromArray() method.

class MinimumAgeRule implements Rule
{
    protected $user;
    protected $minAge;

    public function __construct($user, $minAge)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function validate()
    {
        return $this->user->getAge() >= $this->minAge;
    }
}

Now you are able to configure your rules like this:

$registry = new RuleRegistry();
$registry->add('minimumAge', new Callback(function($minAge) use($currentUser) { return new MinimumAgeRule($currentUser, $minAge); } ));
$registry->add('someOtherRule', new SomeOtherRule());

$builder = new RuleBuilder($registry);
$rule = $builder->fromArray(array(
    'minimumAge' => 21,
    'maximumAge' => 44
));
$rule->validate();

In this case, $currentUser is an object we know in our business logic - so we can just USE it in the callable. $minAge - on the other hand - comes from the nested array object, and is only known during the fromArray() method. As it is passed to our callable, its easy to access